Australia to Host ICC WCF 10th World Chambers Congress

Following a competitive bidding and selection process, Sydney Business Chamber and New South Wales Business Chamber will host the International Chamber of Commerce World Chambers Federation (WCF) 10th World Chambers Congress, which will be returning to the Asia-Pacific region in 2017. WCF is a specialized division of ICC encompassing chambers of commerce from every region of the world.

Under the theme “Sydney: Where Business Connects,” the Australian chambers’ bid presented not only a vibrant city but also a global hub for business opportunities and a new convention centre that will host the future Congress. From exciting outdoor programs to intriguing session proposals, the Australian team successfully highlighted the chambers’ strengths and determination to bring the Congress forward.

“Our commitment to the International Chamber of Commerce’s World Chambers Federation’s mission has been unwavering. Australian chambers have attended every Congress since its inception,” said Stephen Cartwright, CEO of Sydney and New South Wales Business Chambers. “We are extremely excited to open our doors to our colleagues around the world for an unforgettable experience.”

The upcoming 9th World Chambers Congress will be held in Torino, Italy in June 2015. For more information visit the World Chambers Congress website.

Staff contact: Cindy Duncan

New Foreign Trade Regulations Impact ATA Carnet

Latest Update: ATA Carnets are EXEMPT!

As of September 12, 2014:

We are pleased to advise that with the publication of an Interim Final Rule in today’s Federal Register (see below), ATA Carnets have been re-exempted from the filling of Electronic Export Information through the Automated Export System. Items requiring export licenses or permits must continue to file EEI/AES.

While re-exempting carnets, the notice does note that…” the Census Bureau and CBP will review these exemptions in partnership with the trade and may publish a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to address temporary exports, carnets, and TIBs in the future.”

Please continue to visit this page for any new information that may become available.

AES Broadcast # 2014073, Interim Final Rule

September 12, 2014, Publication Announcement:

“The Census Bureau’s Foreign Trade Division (FTD) is announcing the publication of an Interim Final Rule revising the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR), Title 15, Part 30. Specifically, this rule reinstates the previous filing exemptions in Sections 30.37(q) and (r) of the FTR for temporary exports, including carnets, and goods that were imported under a Temporary Import Bond (TIB) for return in the same condition as when imported.

In the Final Rule published on March 14, 2013 (78 FR 16366), the Census Bureau removed these exemptions. After publication, the Census Bureau received comments indicating that unless these exemptions were reinstated, it would be extremely difficult to comply with the FTR, particularly for goods moving on a foreign carnet. As a result, the Census Bureau is publishing this rule to reinstate both exemptions. Despite this change, the Census Bureau and CBP will continue to review these exemptions in partnership with the trade community and may publish a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to address temporary exports, carnets, and TIBs in the future.”

The interim final rule can be found in its entirety here.For further information or questions about the FTR, contact the Regulations, Outreach, and Education Branch (ROEB), Foreign Trade Division.

Telephone: (800) 549-0595, select option 3;
Email: ftdregs@census.gov;
Online: http://census.gov/trade;
Blog: http://globalreach.blogs.census.gov

As of August 14, 2014:

U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the U.S. Census Bureau have confirmed to United States Council for International Business (USCIB) that ATA Carnets will be EXEMPT from filing Electronic Export Information (EEI) into the Automated Export System (AES). Until this confirmation on Wednesday, August 13, ATA Carnet users were to be penalized beginning October 2, 2014 for failure to file the EEI with most carnet shipments.

Census is working to revise the current rules to reflect the exemption. We will advise you as soon as that revision is published and additional guidance is available.

As of April 3, 2014:

USCIB has successfully confirmed the delay in enforcement of the new Foreign Trade Regulations as pertains to ATA Carnet. Therefore, USCIB anticipates that ATA Carnets departing the United States WILL NOT be required to alter their current practice on/or after April 5 as was originally reported.

USCIB received the following FTR Letter No. 8 Notice of 180 Day Informed Compliance Period for Regulatiory Changes stating that the memorandum serves to notify the trade community that the Census Bureau and U.S. CBP agree to provide an additional 180 days to come into compliance with the new requirements. During this time, no penalties will be issued for failure to comply with any new requirements found in the March 14, 2013 rule. However this does not change the EEI filing obligation for ATA Carnet shipments that require export licenses.

USCIB will continue to work with both U.S. Customs and Border Protection and U.S. Census to permanently exclude ATA Carnets from the need to complete an EEI filing through the AES system.

How the New Foreign Trade Regulations Export Requirements Impact ATA Carnet

Historically most ATA Carnets leaving the U.S. have been exempt from the filing of Electronic Export Information (EEI). Beginning April 5, 2014, and as a result of changes to the Foreign Trade Regulations, many exemptions that exist today for ATA Carnet will be greatly curtailed. These changes cover both U.S. and foreign ATA Carnets, as well as those coming from and going to Taiwan (TECRO/AIT).

Narrowing the temporary export exemption

Goods moving under the ATA Carnet are no longer automatically exempt from the EEI filling. To avoid any possible delays in your goods reaching their destination on time we are working with U.S. Census and U.S. CBP to fine-tune the acceptable equivalencies for the required data elements.

ATA Carnet Exemptions

There are still some exemptions that ATA Carnet shipments can qualify for:

  • Low Value Exemption: goods valued at or below $2500 per Schedule B/HTSUS commodity classification code do not need to be reported (15 CFR 30.37(a)). If the General List on the ATA Carnet contains multiple Schedule B/HTSUS numbers, but no single item is valued at more than $2500, then the ATA Carnet shipment will be exempted from the EEI filing requirement.  However, all goods subject to licensing or other export controls must be reported, regardless of value.This exemption needs to be recorded on the yellow exportation counterfoil in box 3 (Other remarks) as: NO EEI per exemption 30.37(a)
    U.S. ATA Carnet Example

    No EEI per Exception 30.37(a)

    Foreign ATA Carnet Example

    No EEI per Exemption 30.37a

  • Hand Carried Tools of the Trade: Goods covered by a U.S. ATA Carnet that are not being shipped, but instead are being hand-carried by the Holder, its sales representative or other authorized representative are NOT required to complete the EEI filing.  When hand carried or checked as excess baggage on a commercial airline samples, professional equipment and goods for exhibitions and fairs are all exempt from filing EEI.The ATA Carnet and its goods must meet all of the following conditions to qualify for this exemption:
    • Are owned by the individual U.S. Principle Party in Interest (USPPI) or exporting company, AND
    • Accompany the individual USPPI, employee, or representative of the exporting company, AND
    • Are necessary and appropriate and intended for the personal and/or business use of the individual USPPI, employee, or representative of the company or business, AND
    • Are not for sale, AND
    • Are returned to the U.S. within one year from the date of export, AND
    • Are not shipped under a bill of lading or an air waybill (i.e., hand carried or checked baggage on a commercial airline)

    To benefit from the Hand Carried Tools of the Trade exemption you will need to write in box 3 (Other remarks) the following: NO EEI per Exemption 30.37(b)
    No EEI per Exception 30.37(b)
    Foreign ATA Carnets that are being hand carried still have to fulfill the EEI filing requirement if any Schedule B number’s total value exceeds $2,500. For items traveling with an export license certain restrictions still apply (15 CFR 740.9).

  • Canada: For shipments originating in the U.S. and where the country of ultimate destination is Canada, an EEI filing is NOT required (see 15 CFR 30.36 (a)). If the goods are going to Canada and then onto another country before returning to the U.S., an EEI will need to be filed.  Indicate on the ATA Carnet number the following:

Export Licenses: New requirements for goods subject to export licenses on ATA Carnet

EEI filings will now require the value of the licensed good to be reported.  This makes it easier to track the value of goods subject to licenses and accurately decrement exports from the licenses (see CFR 15 30.69(b)).

ATA Carnet Interpretation for EEI filing in AES

All ATA Carnet shipments that do not fall under the low valuation, or hand carry tools of the trade exemption, and are not destined for Canada must file EEI using the Automated Export System (AES). A filing must be executed for departure from the U.S. even if the ATA Carnet number and its goods (general list) are the same.

The following list will help you complete some data requirements in AES. These are not all the required and conditional fields, but the ones that require interpretation for ATA Carnet shipments.

  • E-mail Response Address: the completion of an EEI filing will generate an ITN (Internal Transaction Number). The ITN will be emailed to the address (es) provided.
  • Origin State: where the goods begin their journey en route to the port of export.
  • Port of Export: seaport or airport where the goods are loaded on the exporting carrier.
  • Country of Destination: for a U.S. ATA Carnet this will be the first country the ATA Carnet and the goods are traveling to. In the case of a foreign ATA Carnet, the country of destination is the country where the ATA Carnet was issued, for example Germany.
  • Departure Date: the date the goods will leave the U.S.
  • Mode of Transport: the method by which the goods are exported from the U.S.
  • USPPI: for the U.S. ATA Carnet this will be the company listed in box A (Holder) on the ATA Carnet’s green cover. For a foreign ATA Carnet this will also be the holder. Foreign holders may enter their passport number instead of an Employer Identification Number (EIN).
  • Are the USPPI and Ultimate Consignee related companies?: yes, for both enter the Holder listed on the ATA Carnet.
  • Cargo Origin: address of the USPPI where the merchandise actually began its journey to the port of export. For a foreign ATA Carnet, this will be the hotel, or local representative’s address or trade show venue in the U.S.
  • Ultimate Consignee: for U.S. ATA Carnets use the Holder’s company name and contact, but the address will be the hotel or local representative’s address or the trade show venue in the foreign country. In the case of the foreign ATA Carnet this will be the holder company and its address.
  • Schedule B or HTS number: required to be entered in AES for the EEI filing. Schedule B/HTS numbers do not need to appear on the list of goods (general list) on the ATA Carnet. Schedule B/HTS are only necessary for any commodity line whose value exceeds $2,500. U.S. Census has a tool to help you find the correct Schedule B number for your item: Schedule B Search Engine.
  • Commodity Description: general description of the merchandise per Schedule B number. It is not necessary to be as detailed as the general list on the ATA Carnet. A basic description of the type of merchandise will suffice.
  • Value: value of the goods at the U.S. port of export. This means the selling price or cost of goods sold if not sold plus inland or domestic freight, insurance and any other charges. 15 CFR 30.6(a)(16)
  • Export Code: for all ATA Carnet shipments select CR.

Once the EEI filing is submitted you will receive an email confirmation containing your unique Internal Transaction Number (ITN).  This must be recorded on the exportation counterfoil in the box for remarks.

U.S. ATA Carnet Example

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Foreign ATA Carnet Example

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Penalties

Failure to file the EEI is sufficient grounds for US CBP to potentially issue penalties against the exporter for violations of the Foreign Trade Regulations.

Help and reference

To learn about the changes to the Foreign Trade Regulations, especially how terms are defined and how information is to be reported, Click here.

Bahrain Prepares to Implement ATA Carnet System

Bahrain Customs Officials, Chamber staff and business community leaders at ATA Carnet workshop in Manama

Bahrain Customs Officials, Chamber staff and business community leaders at ATA Carnet workshop in Manama

In August, Bahrain took a solid step closer to implementing the ATA Carnet System when the Bahrain Chamber of Commerce hosted an ATA Carnet workshop in Manama, organized by the ATA Carnet Guarantee Association of the United Arab Emirates and the Dubai Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

ATA Carnets are international customs documents that allow goods to enter signatory countries and their territories tax- and duty-free for up to one year. (USCIB administers the Carnet system in the United States.) Bahrain ratified the international convention governing temporary admission of goods last year and has been working with the Dubai Chamber of Commerce to understand and work towards implementing the system.

The United States already has a strong trade relationship with Bahrain which was cemented in 2006 with signing of the U.S.-Bahrain Free Trade Agreement. “Though the FTA has nurtured the relationship between Bahrain and the United States, there is still room for additional growth,” according to Cynthia Duncan, USCIB’s senior vice president for trade services. Signs of this continued growth can be seen by Bahrain moving towards implementing ATA Carnet, she said.

Though the FTA eliminates most customs duties between the two countries, it does not prevent the imposition of import taxes on U.S. goods entering Bahrain. Full implementation of the ATA Carnet system will allow for both duty- and tax-free import and export for goods traveling on a temporary basis for sales meetings, demonstrations and/or trade shows. Once orders are secured with the help of the ATA Carnet, these same exporters can then take advantage of the FTA incentives.

Since the signing of the US-Bahrain FTA, bilateral trade has increased to more than $1.6 billion, as this agreement has allowed U.S. suppliers to be price-competitive in the region. Companies such as Harley-Davidson have eagerly taken advantage of new export opportunities under the FTA. The FTA has also created new opportunities for U.S. financial services, since Bahrain is a financial hub in the Middle East.

Bahrain is currently our 85th largest trading partner with $1.9 billion in two way trade of goods. More importantly to note that goods exported to Bahrain in 2012 totaled $1.2 billion giving the U.S. a goods trade surplus with Bahrain of $508 million. ATA Carnet implementation will only help continue to grow our trade relationship and specifically our exports to Bahrain.

Staff contact: Amanda Barlow

More on USCIB’s ATA Carnet Export Service

Indonesia Moves Towards Accepting ATA Carnets

Participants at an ATA Carnet workshop in Jakarta in July

Participants at an ATA Carnet workshop in Jakarta in July

Indonesia plans to formally announce the implementation of the ATA Carnet system at this December’s World Trade Organization Ministerial Conference in Bali. As part of a move towards closer engagement with the global economy, Indonesia aims to begin accepting ATA Carnets in early 2014.

Adding Indonesia has been a priority of the World ATA Carnet Council, which is chaired by USCIB Senior Vice President Cindy Duncan. Seventy-three countries already actively participate in this worldwide system, which facilitates temporary exports for a wide variety of goods free of duties and taxes.

U.S. trade with Indonesia will directly benefit from this implementation as U.S. businesses are currently major exporters of aircraft, rail equipment and energy-related equipment to Indonesia. Two-way trade between the United States and Indonesia has been on the upswing, reaching $26 billion in 2012 and U.S. exports to Indonesia were up an additional 8.1 percent in the same year. This positive trade growth is expected to be further spurred by Indonesia’s decision to join the ATA Carnet system.

To get the process in motion ICC’s Asia office held workshops and a series of meetings in Jakarta this past July to work on the technicalities of putting the system into place. Approximately 175,000 Carnets worth over $25 billion are issued annually. Indonesia will be a welcome addition to this growing Carnet figure and to continued international cooperation among trading partners. If you are interested in receiving updates and notifications on Indonesia’s status with the ATA Carnet System, please Click Here

The ATA Carnet system is jointly administered by the World Customs Organization and the International Chamber of Commerce’s ICC World Chambers Federation, which administers the ATA Carnet international guarantee chain. USCIB guarantees Carnets in the U.S. and issues them through a network of trusted service providers.

More on USCIB’s ATA Carnet Export Service

USCIB’s Duncan to Head Coordinating Body for Global ATA Carnet System

USCIB’s Cynthia Duncan (right) takes over from Peter Bishop (left) as chair of the World ATA Carnet Council, which manages the global “merchandise passport” system.

USCIB’s Cynthia Duncan (right) takes over from Peter Bishop (left) as chair of the World ATA Carnet Council, which manages the global “merchandise passport” system.

The World ATA Carnet Council (WATAC), the body responsible for managing the international guarantee chain for ATA Carnets – which allow for temporary duty- and tax-free export and import of goods – has elected Cynthia Duncan, USCIB’s senior vice president of Carnet and trade services, as its next chair.

The announcement came at the 8th World Chambers Congress, a biennial event organized by the ICC World Chambers Federation (WCF), in Doha, Qatar. Duncan takes over the leadership role from Peter Bishop, who stepped down after nine years at the helm.

Managed jointly by the WCF and the World Customs Organization, the ATA Carnet system enables duty-free and tax-free temporary import of goods of professional equipment, commercial samples, and goods for trade fairs and exhibitions for up to one year. Today the Carnet system is in force in 73 countries.

Ruedi Bolliger, executive director of the Swiss Chamber of Commerce Alliance, was also elected deputy chair of WATAC.

“With the sound foundation established by Peter Bishop, support of the new vice chair, and the continuing efforts of the carnet community, I expect that the ATA system will grow even stronger in the years to come,” Duncan said.

Duncan has served as head of USCIB Carnet and Trade Services since February 2000. She also serves on the steering committee of World Trade Week NYC and is a member of the New York District Export Council. She is a former member of the board of directors of the Organization of Women in International Trade, New York and previously served in a number of other capacities at USCIB, including as vice president for membership.

Staff contact: Amanda Barlow

More on USCIB’s Carnet and Trade Services Department

 

Madagascar Joins ATA Carnet System for Temporary Imports

Home to amazing wildlife and many miles of scenic coastline, Madagascar is an increasingly popular destination for fashion and other photo shoots.

Home to amazing wildlife and many miles of scenic coastline, Madagascar is an increasingly popular destination for fashion and other photo shoots.

New York, N.Y., April 18, 2013 – The Indian Ocean nation of Madagascar, well known as home to lemurs but also a potentially important destination for U.S. exports and travel, will adopt the ATA Carnet for temporary exports, effective April 22.

The move enables travelers to ship a variety of goods in and out of the country temporarily without paying import duties or taxes, according to the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which administers and guarantees the Carnet system in the U.S.

“While a minor U.S. trading partner right now, we think Madagascar’s growing reputation as a destination for exotic animal and fashion photography will make using Carnets very appealing,” said Cynthia Duncan, USCIB’s senior vice president for trade services. “Professional equipment like that used by photographers is one of the categories of goods covered by a Carnet.”

USCIB, a private, pro-trade group based in New York, administers the ATA Carnet system in the United States. Worldwide, the system is managed jointly by the International Chamber of Commerce and the World Customs Organization. In 2012, the most recent year for which worldwide figures are available, over 150,000 Carnets were issued, covering goods worth more than $17 billion (U.S.)

Beginning next week, those visiting Madagascar may bring product samples, professional equipment and goods for display at trade shows into the country duty-free and tax-free. Carnets are good for one year and can be used in any of the 80-plus countries and customs territories that honor them. Visit www.merchandisepassport.org for details.

Joining the Carnet system is part of Madagascar’s drive for better access to world trade, notably through regional integration and the development of tourism. ATA Carnets will provide a practical tool to foster such integration.

Madagascar is a member of the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), the largest regional economic organization in Africa, with 19 member states and a population of about 390 million. COMESA has a free trade area, with 14 member states, and launched a customs union in 2009.

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, including ICC, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment.

USCIB’s Trade Services include: ATA Carnet, commonly known as the Merchandise Passport, which allows goods to enter over 85 customs territories tax- and duty-free for up to one year; eCertificates of Origin, fully electronic processing of Certificates of Origin, returned to you by e-mail, fast and complaint with ICC Guidelines for Certificates of Origin; and the USCIB International Bookstore, which enables customers to learn international business through unique titles covering a range of topics.

Contact:

Elizabeth Cafaro, USCIB

+1 212.703.5087

More on USCIB’s Trade Services

Albania to Begin Accepting Merchandise Passports

Skandebeg Square in Tirana, Albania

Skandebeg Square in Tirana, Albania

New York, N.Y., February 20, 2013 – The Balkan nation of Albania is the latest country to join the ATA Carnet system, which will begin to accept ATA Carnets starting February 25, 2013. ATA Carnet country members waive customs duties and taxes on many types of goods brought into a country temporarily, according to the United States Council for International Business (USCIB). The move to accept “merchandise passports” is expected to boost U.S. trade with the country.

“Albania’s decision to honor Carnets further extends the system’s reach in Southeastern Europe,” said Cynthia Duncan, USCIB’s Senior Vice President for Trade Services. “This should be a boon for American companies and business travelers in the region.”

Two-way U.S. trade with Albania amounted to $6.7 billion in 2012. Major U.S. exports include food, transportation equipment, machinery, computer and electronic equipment. The adoption of the ATA Carnet system is expected to help boost and diversify U.S. exports to the country.

USCIB, a private, pro-trade group based in New York, administers the ATA Carnet system in the United States. Worldwide, the system is managed jointly by the International Chamber of Commerce and the World Customs Organization. In 2012, the most recent year for which worldwide figures are available, over 150,000 Carnets were issued, covering goods worth more than $17 billion (U.S.)

Beginning February 25, those visiting Albania may bring product samples, professional equipment and goods for display at trade shows into the country duty-free and tax-free. Carnets are good for one year and can be used in any of the 85 countries and customs territories that honor them. Visit www.merchandisepassport.org for details. Prior to the Albania’s decision, Bosnia and Herzegovina, UAE, and Mexico were the latest territories to join the international system.

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, including ICC, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and three valuable trade services to facilitate the international movement of goods. ATA Carnet, commonly known as the Merchandise Passport, allows goods to enter over 85 customs territories tax and duty free for up to one year. eCertificates of Origin, fully electronic processing of Certificates of Origin, returned to you by e-mail, fast and complaint with ICC Guidelines for Certificates of Origin. Finally learn international business with USCIB International Bookstore. More at www.uscib.org.

More on USCIB’s Trade Services

World Trade Week in New York Celebrates Export Success

Rep. Nydia Velázquez (D. – N.Y.) congratulates award winners Kristin McDonough and Peter Bengston of the New York Public Library’s Science, Industry and Business Library.

Rep. Nydia Velázquez (D. – N.Y.) congratulates award winners Kristin McDonough and Peter Bengston of the New York Public Library’s Science, Industry and Business Library.

The global trade community in New York gathered on May 14 to celebrate the contributions of international commerce to the region’s success as World Trade Week was marked by USCIB and an array of pro-trade groups. Several innovative companies and organizations were honored at an awards breakfast hosted by Baruch College’s Weissman Center for International Business.

Rep. Nydia Velázquez (D. – N.Y.) presented an export appreciation award to the New York Public Library’s Science, Industry and Business Library, whose invaluable resources and expertise support international trade outreach and entrepreneurship. In her presentation remarks, Ms. Velázquez applauded the House of Representatives’ vote to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank of the United States

New York City Deputy Mayor Robert Steel delivered keynote remarks, noting that strong exports and presence of many international businesses had helped New York City to outperform the national economy since the 2008-09 downturn. He said the city needed to focus on continuing to generate high-quality jobs, and that Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s administration was taking a number of steps to nurture a pro-startup environment, including the development of the new Cornell-Technion science and technology campus on Roosevelt Island.

USCIB’s Michael Megliola and Justine Kharnak at the ATA Carnet booth

USCIB’s Michael Megliola and Justine Kharnak at the ATA Carnet booth

Cynthia Duncan, USCIB’s senior vice president for trade services, is a member of the World Trade Week 2012 steering committee. The ATA Carnet service, which helps exporters and others speed shipment of goods temporarily to more than 80 countries, duty-free and tax-free, was on display along with other USCIB services at a booth in the exhibition hall.

Other award winners included North Shore International Inc., Karp Associates, Inc., Action Environmental Group, B&H Photo & Electronics Corp., and the Westconn International Trade Association.

Overall more than 300 people attended the awards breakfast, and many more took part in a series of informative events throughout New York City during World Trade Week.

Staff contact: Cynthia Duncan

More on USCIB’s ATA Carnet Export Service

Get Ready for the Mexico G20 Summit With Essential Resources from USCIB

G20 leaders are making tracks for Los Cabos, and with informative, time-saving resources from USCIB, so can you.

G20 leaders are making tracks for Los Cabos, and with informative, time-saving resources from USCIB, so can you.

New York, N.Y., April 5, 2012 – Are you planning to cover or attend the G20 Summit in Los Cabos, Mexico this June?  Time-saving, informative resources from the United States Council for International Business (USCIB) can help get you on your way. What’s more, you’ll save money and hassle if you’re bringing video gear or other valuable professional equipment into the country.

USCIB is a business association that serves as the U.S. arm of the International Chamber of Commerce, the world business organization whose online bookstore (www.ICCBooksUSA.net) currently features a timely publication, “The G20 – What it is and what it does: A business guide.”

An essential guide for business executives, policy makers and the media. This handbook explains in detail what the G20 is, traces its origins and explains the reasons for its transformation into a top leadership group. It identifies the critical impacts that G20 policy developments may have on global economic activity and focuses on issues of special interest for business. Click here to order your copy today.

Merchandise passports speed shipment of your gear

Media representatives should know about the ATA Carnet export service from USCIB. Carnets are internationally recognized customs documents that speed delivery of professional equipment, as well as professional samples and goods for trade shows, to over 80 countries and customs territories, duty- and tax-free.

Mexico began accepting these “merchandise passports” last year, just in time for the global media onslaught that accompanies the G20 Summit. Goods brought into Mexico under Carnet and re-exported within one year are not subject to import duties or taxes.

Applying for a Carnet is easy, and Carnets are a simpler alternative to temporary import bonds or other products. More information is available at www.merchandisepassport.org. USCIB has a Mexico Carnet resources page to view click here.

So get informed, get a Carnet, get your gear, and get ready to cover the G20 Summit.

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and prudent regulation. Its members include top U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world.

With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP Communications, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

More on USCIB’s ATA Carnet Export Service

ICC Books USA online bookstore

Get Ready for the Mexico G20 Summit With Essential Resources from USCIB

G20 leaders are making tracks for Los Cabos, and with informative, time-saving resources from USCIB, so can you.

G20 leaders are making tracks for Los Cabos, and with informative, time-saving resources from USCIB, so can you.

New York, N.Y., April 5, 2012 – Are you planning to cover or attend the G20 Summit in Los Cabos, Mexico this June?  Time-saving, informative resources from the United States Council for International Business (USCIB) can help get you on your way. What’s more, you’ll save money and hassle if you’re bringing video gear or other valuable professional equipment into the country.

USCIB is a business association that serves as the U.S. arm of the International Chamber of Commerce, the world business organization whose online bookstore (www.ICCBooksUSA.net) currently features a timely publication, “The G20 – What it is and what it does: A business guide.”

An essential guide for business executives, policy makers and the media. This handbook explains in detail what the G20 is, traces its origins and explains the reasons for its transformation into a top leadership group. It identifies the critical impacts that G20 policy developments may have on global economic activity and focuses on issues of special interest for business. Click here to order your copy today.

Merchandise passports speed shipment of your gear

Media representatives should know about the ATA Carnet export service from USCIB. Carnets are internationally recognized customs documents that speed delivery of professional equipment, as well as professional samples and goods for trade shows, to over 80 countries and customs territories, duty- and tax-free.

Mexico began accepting these “merchandise passports” last year, just in time for the global media onslaught that accompanies the G20 Summit. Goods brought into Mexico under Carnet and re-exported within one year are not subject to import duties or taxes.

Applying for a Carnet is easy, and Carnets are a simpler alternative to temporary import bonds or other products. More information is available at www.merchandisepassport.org. USCIB has a Mexico Carnet resources page to view click here.

So get informed, get a Carnet, get your gear, and get ready to cover the G20 Summit.

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and prudent regulation. Its members include top U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world.

With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP Communications, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

More on USCIB’s ATA Carnet Export Service

ICC Books USA online bookstore