Shiles Joins USCIB as Head of ATA Carnet and Trade Services

Andrew Shiles

New York, N.Y., May 16, 2017 – Former FedEx executive and cargo industry veteran Andrew Shiles has joined the United States Council for International Business (USCIB) to lead the association’s dynamic portfolio of trade services, including the “merchandise passports” used by thousands of exporters around the world to get goods through customs quickly and easily.

As senior vice president of ATA Carnet and trade services, Shiles will work to expand U.S. trade interests through promotion of the ATA Carnet program. ATA Carnets are internationally recognized customs documents that permit temporary duty-free, tax-free entry of qualified goods for up to one year. They are used widely to facilitate entry of goods for trade shows, product samples and professional equipment.

“Andy Shiles brings extensive experience to this position,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “He has in-depth knowledge of trade and customs affairs, including ATA Carnet, and relationships with clients ranging from multinational corporations to SMEs to freight forwarders. In addition, Andy has strong connections with U.S. Customs, and has engaged in a number of important industry trade associations.”

USCIB manages and guarantees the ATA Carnet system in the United States, with responsibility for issuing ATA Carnets falling to two outside service providers, Roanoke Trade and the Corporation for International Business. ATA Carnets are accepted in 84 countries and territories, while the global ATA systems is overseen by the World Customs Organization (WCO) and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC). USCIB serves as ICC’s American national committee.

Shiles comes to USCIB following more than 30 years at FedEx Express, the world’s largest air express cargo company, most recently as global regulatory compliance manager, where he served on USCIB’s Customs and Trade Facilitation Committee. His leadership experience in global supply-chain management includes participation in U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s Simplified Entry Working Group, which redesigned and implemented the current entry-clearance process into the United States.

Shiles also has extensive experience working with multiple government agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration, Department of Agriculture and Consumer Product Safety Commission. A self-professed “Yankee with a Southern accent,” Shiles was born in Manhattan and raised in the Southwest and in Tennessee, where he received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Memphis. He is a member of the International Compliance Professionals Association and the American Association of Exporters and Importers.

Find out more about the services offered by USCIB to facilitate cross-border trade and investment at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP communications, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, including ICC, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment.

Kazakhstan to Begin Accepting “Merchandise Passports”

Baiterek TowerNew York, N.Y., March 21, 2017 – Kazakhstan is set to become the 77th member country to accept ATA Carnets for the temporary, duty-free importation of various types of goods, beginning April 1, according to the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which administers the ATA system in the United States.

Known as “merchandise passports,” ATA Carnets are international customs documents that allow for the temporary importation of various types of goods, duty-free and tax-free, for up to one year. In most ATA member countries and territories, including Kazakhstan after April 1, Carnets cover import of professional equipment, commercial samples and items for display at exhibitions and fairs. The worldwide ATA Carnet system is overseen by the World Customs Organization and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), for which USCIB serves as the American national committee.

“The implementation of the ATA system demonstrates Kazakhstan’s commitment to promoting economic growth and trade facilitation,” stated USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson. “Use of Carnets will make it easier for American and other foreign companies to do business with the country, while enabling Kazakhstan businesses easier access to the U.S. and global markets.”

The Republic of Kazakhstan is the ninth largest country in the world by area and is the world´s largest landlocked nation. ATA membership by the country – long regarded as a priority for other countries in the system – will significantly facilitate trade relations between Kazakhstan businesses and their foreign partners. The Chamber of International Commerce of Kazakhstan has been designated as the official guaranteeing organization for ATA Carnets in the country.

Prior to Kazakhstan, Brazil and Indonesia were the two most recent countries to join the global ATA Carnet system. More than 180,000 Carnets are issued every year worldwide, for goods with a total value of over US$21 billion. The United States is the third-largest user of ATA Carnets, following Germany and Switzerland. The Republic of Georgia is expected to join the ATA system in the near future.

Find out more about the services offered by USCIB to facilitate cross-border trade and investment at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP communications, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, including ICC, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment.

Value Added Tax Rates (VAT) By Country

Countries A - HCountries I - NCountries P - W

ALBANIA

ICELAND

PAKISTAN

· Duties 0-15%· Duties 0-30% (avg. 3.6%)· GST 17%
· VAT 20%· VAT 7.5%, 25.5%· Duties 0-30%
· Excise tax 7-40% (vehicles)

ALGERIA

INDIA

POLAND

· VAT 7, 17%· VAT 13.5%· Duties 0-15% (avg. 4.2%)
· Duties 3-40%· Duties 0-40%· VAT 7, 23%
· TSA 1 (Luxuries) 20-110%· Excise Taxes 8-24%
· Educational CESS: 3%

ANDORRA

INDONESIA

PORTUGAL

· Duties 1-7% (avg. 3.6%)· Duties 0-40% (avg. 10.89%)· Duties 0-15% (avg. 4.2%)
· VAT 4.5%· VAT 0-15% (10% standard)· VAT 23%
· GST 10-50% (on luxury goods)

ARUBA

IRELAND

PUERTO RICO (USA)

· Duties 0-12% (avg. 3%)· Duties 5-20% (avg. 3.5%)· Import Tax 0-7% (under review)
· VAT 23%

AUSTRALIA

ISLE OF MAN (United Kingdom)

REUNION ISLAND (France)

· Duties 0-17.5%· VAT 5, 20%· VAT 2.1, 8.5%
· GST 2 10%· Duties 5-15%· Duties may apply

AUSTRIA

ISRAEL

ROMANIA

· Duties 3.5-15% (avg. 3.5%)· Purchase Tax 5-90%· Duties 0-30% (avg. 11.7%)
· VAT 20%· Duties 0.8-80%· VAT 24%
· VAT 18%
· Linkage charge (CPI variance)

AZORES (Portugal)

ITALY

RUSSIA

· VAT 13%· Duties 5-20% (avg. 3.5%)· Duties 5-20% (avg. 14%)
· Import duties may apply· VAT 22%· VAT 18%,10%
· Excise Tax 20-570%

BALEARIC ISLANDS (See Spain)

JAPAN

SENEGAL

· Consumption Tax 5%· Customs Duties 0-20%
· VAT 18%
· Excise tax 0-50%

BELARUS

JERSEY (United Kingdom)

SERBIA

· Duties 20-40%· VAT 0%· Duties 0-30% (avg. 9.4%)
· VAT 20%· GST 5%· VAT 20%
· Duties 0-22%· Excise tax 5-70%

BELGIUM

KAZAKHSTAN

SINGAPORE

· Duties 3.5-15% (avg. 3.5%)· VAT 12%· GST 7%
· VAT 12, 21%· Import Tax 0-1%
· Vehicle tax 0-30%

BOSNIA & HERZEGOVINA

LATVIA

SLOVAKIA

· VAT 17%· Duties 0-55% (avg. 15%)· Duties 0-15% (avg. 4.2%)
· Duties 0-15%· VAT 20%· VAT 10, 20%

BOTSWANA

LEBANON

SLOVENIA

· Duties 37.5% (65%, motor vehicle)· VAT 10%· Duties 0-20% (avg. 4.2%)
· VAT 12%· Duties 0-70% (avg. 15%)· VAT 8.5, 22%
· Excise Tax 5-35% (luxury goods)

BRAZIL

LESOTHO (SACU)

SOUTH AFRICA

· Duties 10-35%· Duties 0-40%· Duties 0-40% (avg. 20%)
· COFIN Tax 13.57%· VAT 14% · Excise Tax 5-10% (incl. vehicles)
· IPI Tax 0-20%· VAT 14%
· VAT 7-18% (per state)
· PIS Tax 2.62%

BULGARIA

LIECHTENSTEIN (Admin by Switz.)

SOUTH KOREA

· Duties 5-40%· VAT 8%· Duties 7.9% (avg.)
· VAT 7, 20%· VAT 10%
· Excise tax 15-100% (luxury items, electric goods)

CANADA

LITHUANIA

SPAIN

· Duties 0-20%· Duties 0-15%· Duties 0-20% (avg. 4.2%)
· GST 5%· VAT 21%· VAT 21%
· Excise Tax 10-100%

CANARY ISLANDS (Spain)

LUXEMBOURG

SRI LANKA

· VAT 0%· Duties 5-14%· Duties 5-35%,
· IGIC/AIEM 5 4.5% (some imports)· VAT 3, 15%· Motor vehicles 25%
· VAT 12%

CEUTA (Spain)

MACAO, CHINA

ST. BARTHELEMY (France)

· VAT 0%· VAT 0%· VAT 2.1, 8.5%
· IPSI 6 3% (some imports)· Consumption tax 0%
· Motor Vehicle tax 10-55%

CHILE

MACEDONIA

ST. MARTIN (French side)

· Duties 6-16.5%· Duties 0-30%, average 14.5%· VAT 2.1, 8.5%
· VAT 19%· VAT 5% (computer goods, medical goods),18% (all others)
· Luxury Tax 50-85%· Excise Tax 5-62%

CHINA

MADAGASCAR

ST. PIERRE ( France)

· Duties 0-35% (motor vehicles 34.2%)· Duties 5-25%· VAT 0%
· VAT 17%· VAT 20%· Duties 0-5%
· Consumption Tax 5-10%

CORSICA (France)

MADEIRA (Portugal)

SWAZILAND (SACU)

· VAT 8, 19.6%· VAT 22%· Sales tax (VAT) 14%
· Duties 0-40%

COTE D’ IVOIRE

MALAYSIA

SWEDEN

· Duties 0-35%· Duties 0-300% (avg. 8.1%)· Duties 2-14% (avg. 4.2%)
· VAT 18, 20%· GST 5-10%· VAT 25%

CROATIA

MALTA

SWITZERLAND

· Duties 0-18%VAT 18%· Duties 3.2% (avg.)
· VAT 10, 25%Duties 0-12% · VAT 8%, 2.4%
· Motor Vehicles Tax 0- 48%· Statistical/Environmental Tax 3% (Co2 Emissions)

CURACAO

MARTINIQUE

TAHITI (France)

· VAT 6%· VAT 2.1, 8.5%· VAT 2,4,6%
· Excise duties 0-17%

CYPRUS

MAURITIUS

TAIWAN

· VAT 18%· Duties 0-80%· Duties 2-60% (avg. 8.2%)
· Duties 0-30%· VAT 15%· VAT 5%

CZECH REPUBLIC

MAYOTTE (France)

TASMANIA (Australia)

· Duties 0-20% (avg.)· VAT 0%· GST 10%
· VAT 15, 21%· Import duties may apply· Duties 0-17.5%

DENMARK

MELILLA (Spain)

THAILAND

· Duties 5-14%· VAT 0%· Duties 0-45%
· VAT 25%· IPSI 4% (some imports)· VAT 7%
· Excise Tax 25-80% (luxury goods)

ESTONIA

MEXICO

TUNISIA

· VAT 20%· IVA 8 10-16%· Duties 10-43% (avg. 34%, reduction to 25% considered)
· Avg. duty rate 5%· VAT 18, 12 and 6% (most goods 18%)
· Luxury Tax 10-700%
· Customs Formality Fee 3%

FAROE ISLANDS (Denmark)

MIQUELON (France)

TURKEY

· Duties 0-25%· VAT 0%· Duties 0-20% (avg. 5%)
· Duties 0-5%· VAT 18%
· Consumption Tax 7-40% (some luxury items & motor vehicles)

FINLAND

MOLDOVA

TURKS & CAICOS

· Duties 0-35%· VAT 20%, reduced rate 8%· Duties 0-45% (vehicles highest)
· VAT 24%· Customs surcharge 10%

FRANCE

MONACO (Admin by France)

United Arab Emirates

· Duties 5-17%· VAT 5.5, 19.6%· Duties 4-5%
· VAT 5.5, 19.6%· Duties 5-17%· Motor Vehicles & Boats 5%

GERMANY

MONGOLIA

UKRAINE

· Duties 5-17%· VAT 10%· Duties 0-20 (avg. 16%)
· VAT 7, 19%· General import tariff 5%· VAT 20%
· Excise tax 0-300% (vehicles and jewelry included)

GIBRALTAR

MONTENEGRO

UNITED KINGDOM

· VAT 0%· VAT 7, 17%· Duties 0-15% (avg. 4.2%)
· Duties 12% (avg.)· Duties 5% (avg.)· VAT 20%
· Vehicles 25-30%

GREECE

MOROCCO

WALLIS & FUTUNA (France)

· Duties 5-7% (vehicles higher)· Duties 2.5-200% (avg. 10%)· VAT 2-6%
· VAT 9, 23%· VAT 10, 20%

GREENLAND (Denmark)

NAMIBIA (SACU)

· VAT 0%· Duties 0-85%
· Import surcharges may apply to raw materials· VAT 15%

GUADELOUPE (France)

NETHERLANDS

· VAT 2.1, 8.5%· Duties 5-20% (avg. 3.5%)
· VAT 6, 21%

GUERNSEY (United Kingdom)

NEW CALEDONIA (France)

· VAT 0%· VAT 0%
· Duties 0-22%· TBI 9 5%
· Duties 0-20%

HONG KONG

NEW ZEALAND

· Registration Tax 35-100% (motor vehicles)· Duties 0-15%
· GST 0%· GST 15%

HUNGARY

NORWAY

· Duties 0-60% (8% avg.)· VAT 12-25%
· VAT 27%· Duties 0-8%
· Excise Tax 10-35% (luxury goods)· Vehicles 10-60%

(1) TSA – Tax Specific Additional
(2) GST – Goods and services tax
(3) HST – Harmonized sales tax
(4) QST – Quebec sales tax
(5) IGIC – General indirect tax of the Canary Islands
(6) IPSI – General indirect tax (Ceuta & Melilla)
(7) IVA – Value added tax (Mexico)
(8) TBI – Import tax (New Caledonia)

ATA Carnet Countries

Appointed by the national government, a National Guaranteeing Association (NGA) may administer Carnets in one or multiple territories.

Each NGA is a member of the World Chambers Federation (WCF) and the World ATA Carnet Council, both divisions of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC). WCF and the World Customs Organization (WCO) manage the Carnet system worldwide.

Countries Coming Soon:

Saudi Arabia
Qatar

Non-Carnet Countries:

Click here for a partial list of destinations not yet accepting Carnets.

Carnet Countries:

Carnets will be accepted in these countries / destinations. Click to learn under which customs administration the Carnet system is managed and under what conditions.

A - EF -LM - PR-W
AlbaniaFaroe Islands (Denmark)Macao, ChinaReunion Island (France)
AlgeriaFinland (EU)MacedoniaRomania (EU)
AndorraFrance (EU)MadagascarRussia
AntarcticaFrench Guiana (France)Madeira (Portugal)Senegal
ArubaFrench Polynesia - Tahiti (France)MalaysiaSerbia
AustraliaGermany (EU)Malta (EU)Singapore
Austria (EU)GibraltarMartinique (France)Slovakia (EU)
Azores (Portugal)Greece (EU)MauritiusSlovenia (EU)
BahrainGuadeloupe (France)Mayotte (France)South Africa
Balearic Islands (Spain)GuamMelilla (Spain)Spain (EU)
BelarusGuernsey (UK)MexicoSri Lanka
Belgium (EU)Hong Kong, ChinaMiquelon (France)St. Barthélemy (France)
Bosnia & HerzegovinaHungary (EU)MoldovaSt. Martin (French side)
BotswanaIcelandMonaco (France)St. Pierre (France)
BrazilIndiaMongoliaSwaziland (South Africa)
BulgariaIndonesiaMontenegroSweden (EU)
CanadaIranMoroccoSwitzerland
Canary Islands (Spain)Ireland (EU)Namibia (South Africa)Taiwan*
Ceuta (Spain)Isle of Man (UK)Netherlands (EU)Tasmania (Australia)
ChileIsraelNew Caledonia (France)Thailand
ChinaItaly (EU)New ZealandTunisia
Corsica (France)JapanNorwayTurkey
Cote d'Ivoire|Ivory CoastJersey (UK)PakistanUkraine
Croatia (EU)KazakhstanPoland (EU)United Arab Emirates
CuraçaoKoreaPortugal (EU)United Kingdom (EU)
Cyprus (EU)Latvia (EU)Puerto Rico (USA)United States of America
Czech Republic (EU)LebanonWallis Futuna Islands (France)
Denmark (EU)Lesotho (South Africa)
Estonia (EU)Liechtenstein
European UnionLithuania (EU)
Luxembourg (EU)

*TECRO/AIT Carnets are accepted for goods traveling between Taiwan and the U.S. only.

Non-Carnet Countries

 

Some destinations that do not accept ATA Carnets

 

Caribbean Islands

AnguillaAntiguaBahamasBarbados
BarbudaBermudaCayman IslandsDominica
GrenadaJamaicaNetherlands AntillesSt. Kitts-Nevis
St. LuciaSt. Vincent GrenadinesTrinidad & TobagoTurks & Caicos Islands
UK Virgin Islands: Tortola
 

Middle East

EgyptKuwaitJordanOman
QatarSaudi Arabia*Syria
 

South & Central American Nations

ArgentinaCosta RicaHonduras
 

Other Destinations

Fiji IslandsGreenlandIraqKenya
Philippines
* Coming Soon
 

U.S. Protectorates


US CBP does not administer customs in these protectorates, thus Carnets are not valid customs documents.

American Samoa

Guam

Saipan

US Virgin Islands: St. Croix, St. John, & St. Thomas

ATA Carnets MAY be accepted in the countries above and others, however, USCIB will not guarantee their acceptance as a means of temporary importation.

ATA Carnet FAQs

 

Here are some of the most commonly asked questions about Carnets:

Obtaining and Using a U.S. Carnet:

  1. What options do I have if I am taking goods out of the country and planning to return them?
  2. Why must a security deposit be provided?
  3. How specific do the descriptions need to be on the General List?
  4. Some items on my Carnet will travel to country A and others to country B a week later. Do I need multiple Carnets?
  5. Who in my company should sign section “F. obligation” on the application and the General List?
  6. How to use ATA Carnet in EU Countries?
  7. Are there specific regulations for goods entering India?
  8. Are there specific regulations for goods entering China?
  9. Do I still need an export License when using a carnet?
  10. I need to move goods out of the U.S. , but do not have a legal residence or Taxpayer ID in the U.S. Is it possible to obtain a U.S. Carnet?
  11. I am checking my Carnet goods with my baggage to leave the U.S. Where do I get my Carnet stamped?

Avoiding a Claim on a U.S. Carnet – Cancellation and Claims

  1. When do I return the Carnet?
  2. To where do I return the Carnet?
  3. My Carnet is still valid, but I have used all the counterfoils and vouchers. What should I do?
  4. We have lost our Carnet. What shall we do?
  5. I received a duplicate Carnet after I lost the original. The duplicate was sent back to you so why do I still receive reminder letters?
  6. Can I sell the goods under Carnet?
  7. I have a U.S. Carnet, but the goods will not leave before it expires. What do I do?
  8. My Carnet was never used. Do I still return it?
  9. Are there restrictions on Items with jade and rubies from Myanmar?

Using a Foreign Carnet in the U.S.

  1. What if I don’t get my carnet stamped leaving the country?
  2. My goods need to stay in the U.S. beyond Carnet expiration. What are my options?
  3. May I use a foreign Carnet to enter Puerto Rico, Guam or the U.S. Virgin Islands?
  4. I would like to sell my goods imported into the U.S. on foreign-issued Carnet. How should I proceed?
  5. Are there restrictions on items with jade and rubies from Myanmar?
  6. Can I bring a vehicle into the U.S. under a foreign-issued Carnet?
  7. I am checking my Carnet goods with my baggage to leave the U.S. Where do I get my Carnet stamped?

General Information:

  1. What do the acronyms ATA and TECRO/AIT represent?
  2. What is the Origin of the ATA Carnet System?
  3. How do I learn about the Carnets around the world?
  4. How does the new Electronic Export Information filing requirement impact your ATA Carnet?


Obtaining and Using a U.S. Carnet

  1. What options do I have if I am taking goods out of the country and planning to return them?
    All countries have procedures allowing for the temporary importation of goods for across their borders. Such importations are generally valid for less than 12 months Importers may choose from three options when considering a temporary importation: (1) Duty refund, (2) Temporary importation under bond (TIB), and (3) Carnet.

    • Duty refund is the process by which an importer registers the goods at the time of entry, and deposits the applicable duties and taxes. In Europe, duty and taxes range from 20-30%, Australia 50%, China 40%, of the value of the goods. (Check VAT chart for details.) At the time of departure, the exporter presents the goods and appropriate paperwork to a customs inspector. Exporters can expect to receive a full refund of the duties and taxes posted at some future point. (For Europe, refunds are generally made 2-6 months after departure. Payments are made in local currency, e.g., South African Rand.)
    • To use a TIB, importers are required to secure the TIB from a customhouse broker at the time of entry into the foreign country. The purchase of a TIB is required for each country visited on every trip. Fees for TIBs vary widely.
    • Carnets: May be used for unlimited exits from and entries into the U.S. and foreign countries; are accepted in over 85 countries and territories worldwide; eliminate value-added taxes (VAT), duties, and the posting of security normally required at the time of importation; and simplify customs procedures. Carnets allow temporary exporters to use a single document for all customs transactions, make arrangements in advance, and at a predetermined cost. Carnets facilitate reentry into the U.S. by eliminating the need to register goods with U.S. Customs at the time of departure.

  2. Why must a security deposit be provided?
    The ATA Carnet conventions require it. Equally important, security deposits provide financial stability to the ATA system. There is one designated Guaranteeing Association in each country where Carnets are accepted. The role of the Guaranteeing Association is to guarantee the payment of duties and taxes to customs authorities (both domestic and foreign) that present valid claims. In the case of the U.S., the USCIB must pay all valid claims (resulting from Carnets originating in the U.S.) to foreign authorities and to U.S. Customs on all foreign Carnets.
  3. How specific do the descriptions need to be on the General List?
    The more specific the better, as customs has the right to stop goods from entering its border for lack of adequate description. Include serial numbers or model numbers whenever possible. An imprecise or incomplete description may cause a customs inspector to question the importation (or re-exportation) and possibly seize the goods.
  4. Some items on my Carnet will travel to country A and others to country B a week later. Do I need multiple Carnets?
    Not necessarily, split shipments are possible. Depending on amount of time between the two shipments a second Carnet may be advised. Call your Carnet Service Bureau for details.
  5. Who in my company should sign section “F. Obligation” on the application and the General List?
    It would have to besomeone who possesses the authority to obligate the company to payment of duties and taxes should they come due.
  6. How to use ATA Carnet in EU countries?
    The twenty seven members of the European Union (EU) are one customs union and are noted as such on the green cover of your carnet. Customs documentation is not required when traveling between/among EU states. Assuming carnet goods are traveling by vehicle from the UK through France and Spain and departing from the EU from Portela airport in Lisbon, the goods will only be subject to two customs clearances, one in England and one in Portugal. The carnet importation counterfoil and voucher should be validated upon arrival at Heathrow airport in the England and then again at departure in Portugal where the re-exportation sheets should be stamped.Please keep in mind that Switzerland and Norway are not members of the EU and thus customs clearance would be required for either/both.
  7. Are there specific regulations for goods entering India?
    India will only accept goods under Carnet if the intended use is for exhibitions and fairs, and generally allows the goods to remain in India for six months.
  8. Are there specific regulations for goods entering China?
    China will only accept goods under Carnet if the intended use is for exhibitions and fairs, and generally allows the goods to remain in China for six months.
  9. Do I still need an export license when using a Carnet?
    Yes, please click here for more details.
  10. I need to move goods out of the U.S. , but do not have a legal residence in the U.S. Is it possible to obtain a U.S. Carnet?
    In most Instances, it is not possible to obtain a U.S. Carnet without a legal residence and Taxpayer ID. To discuss your specific circumstances contact Glendy Sung at 212.703.5073 or gsung@uscib.org.
  11. I am checking my Carnet goods with my baggage to leave the U.S. Where do I get my Carnet stamped?
    Present your Carnet and goods to U.S. Customs before checking in your baggage and boarding your flight, even if it connects at another U.S. city. U.S. Customs and Border Protection has recently ruled that Carnets should be stamped out of the U.S. (export or re-export) where the Carnet holder last had control of the goods and is not able to come into contact with them until they have arrived at the final foreign destination.For example, a U.S. company is going to show some samples listed on an ATA Carnet to a potential customer in the U.K. The Carnet holder has a flight from Dallas to New York, connecting to a New York-Heathrow flight. He would present his goods and Carnet at U.S. Customs at Dallas for export validation before checking in his luggage with the air carrier through to London.The policy decision by U.S. Customs is based on CBP Directive 3280-013B and Muster Topic (#CCS-FY12-0031) dated 10/17/2011 in conjunction with the Office of Field Operations.

Avoiding a Claim on a U. S. Carnet – Cancellation and Claims

  1. When do I return the Carnet?
    The Carnet should be returned after its final use or immediately after its expiration whichever comes first.
  2. To where do I return the Carnet?
    The Carnet holder should make and keep a clear copy of the whole Carnet booklet (all used and even un-used sheets), and return the original via receipted mail to the company that issued you the Carnet.
  3. My Carnet is still valid, but I have used all the counterfoils and vouchers. What should I do?
    If you need to make additional trips with your Carnet, you may apply for additional sets of counterfoils and vouchers by simply contacting the company that issued the Carnet for assistance in obtaining additional sets. The cost is $20 per set (minimum charge is $75.) plus shipping and handling. This fee includes up to four sets of yellow, white or blue counterfoils and their corresponding vouchers.
  4. We have lost our Carnet. What shall we do?
    Call the office that issued your Carnet. If you wish, a duplicate will be issued. Additional fees will apply.
  5. I received a duplicate Carnet after I lost the original. The duplicate was sent back to you, so why do I still receive reminder letters?
    In order to cancel a Carnet, both the duplicate and the original must be returned. Carnets not returned will be considered “open”. Security deposits on “open” Carnets will not be returned or cancelled until 13 months after Carnet expiration, and reminder letters are generated on any Carnet not returned.
  6. Can I sell the goods covered under Carnet?
    Carnets should be used for goods NOT intended for sale. However, it is possible to sell off a Carnet. In addition to the payment of duties and taxes, goods sold off Carnet are subject to a penalty equal to 10% of the amount of the duties and taxes. A USCIB Claims Handling Fee may also apply.For goods sold off Carnet, it is recommended that you contact a local customs office to determine the procedure best suited to your circumstance. Some countries, e.g., U.K. and Australia tightly control the sale of goods off Carnet. Generally, local customs will request that the goods and Carnet be brought to the local office prior to Carnet expiration so that the Carnet may be properly discharged and duties, taxes, and penalty paid. BE SURE TO OBTAIN AN ITEMIZED CUSTOMS RECEIPT noting the: items sold, amount paid, and Carnet number. Send the original Carnet and a copy of the Customs receipt to the company that issued your Carnet. Be sure to retain a clear copy of the Carnet for your records.

  7. I have a U.S. Carnet, but the goods will not leave before it expires. What do I do?
    For goods that must remain in the foreign country beyond the Carnet expiration date, it may be possible to obtain a “replacement Carnet.” A replacement Carnet has a new Carnet number but contains the same General List as the original Carnet. The Replacement is typically good for one year. The Replacement and original Carnet are presented to foreign customs at which time the original is ‘closed’ and the Replacement is ‘opened’ thus allowing the goods to remain past the date of expiration on the original document. For details, contact the office that issued your Carnet at least 30 days before expiration.
  8. My Carnet was never used. Do I still have to return it?
    Yes, all Carnets must be returned even if they were never used. Carnets that are not returned will be considered “open” and thus, the associated security deposit will remain in effect until the time during which a customs claim may be submitted to USCIB has ended.
  9. Are there restrictions on items with jade and rubies from Myanmar?
    Yes, as of 1 October 2008, no rubies or jaderie of Burmese origin may be imported into the US, whether mounted or unmounted. Any such shipments will be seized upon importation by US Customs. If the rubies or jaderie were imported prior to the embargo and have not under gone any change since importation they may go on a US carnet as long as there is substantial proof to support this claim. This proof of importation must be presented with the carnet when exiting and re-entering the US.

Using a Foreign Carnet in the U.S.

  1. What if I don’t get my carnet stamped leaving the country?
    Please be advised that it is the carnet holder’s responsibility to have the carnet validated both in and out of the U.S. This means that if a U.S. Customs office has office hours before or after your flight, you must make arrangements to have the goods examined and carnet stamped. You can find the contact information for all ports of entry at: http://www.cbp.gov. If you fail to have your carnet validated for re-exportation and have your carnet stamped into a third country or upon re-importation before carnet expiration, you will be faced with a $50 regularization fee in the event of a claim issued later by U.S. Customs.If you fail to have your carnet validated for re-exportation and have any other form of foreign customs validation before carnet expiration (Landing Certificate, Certificate of Location, Waybill, Bill of Lading, etc.) you will be faced with a $100 regularization fee in the event of a claim issued later by U.S. Customs.
  2. My goods need to stay in the U.S. beyond Carnet expiration. What are my options?
    According to U.S. Customs regulations, foreign-issued Carnets may not be extended beyond expiration. Please note consumption entries are not allowed to discharge a Carnet entry. This may result in a second payment of duties on a claim made on the Carnet. However, to keep the merchandise in the U.S. beyond the expiration of the Carnet there are two options:

    1. File a T.I.B. (Temporary Importation under Bond / Temporary Import Bond) through a customs broker with U.S. Customs before the expiration of the Carnet. This will allow the merchandise to remain in the country for an additional year. The Carnet number must appear on the TIB paperwork and the merchandise description, weight, and value must be the same as those on the Carnet General List. The Carnet’s re-exportation voucher should be presented and validated by U.S. Customs referencing the TIB number and date. Copies of both bond and Carnet should be kept so that upon final re-exportation and re-importation into the country of issue, customs may clear the goods without unnecessary assessment of duties.
    2. Mitigation of duties may be afforded if the merchandise is re-exported after Carnet expiration:
      1. Re-exportation validated in the Carnet up to 90 days after Carnet expiration will result in the collection of 25% of the duty and 10% penalty within the case of a claim made on the Carnet, with a minimum of $50; or
      2. Re-exportation validated in the Carnet between 90 and 180 days after Carnet expiration will result in the collection of 50% of the duty and 10% penalty, with a minimum of $100.

      Goods re-exported 181 days after Carnet expiration are subject to the collection of the full amount of duty and 10% penalty.

  3. May I use a foreign Carnet to enter Puerto Rico, Guam or the U.S. Virgin Islands?
    Foreign carnets may be used for entry into Puerto Rico, but not for Guam or the U.S. Virgin islands (St. John, St. Croix, or St. Thomas)
  4. I would like to sell my goods imported into the U.S. on a foreign-issued Carnet. How should I proceed?
    If the Carnet has not yet expired, contact, either directly or through customs broker, the Entry Team at the Customs port of importation and request an anticipatory breach of the Carnet.Documents required to accompany the anticipatory breach are:

    1. A letter on the Carnet holder letterhead itemizing the goods that will not be re-exported and requesting to pay liquidated damages
    2. Copy of the front cover of the Carnet, the General List, and the Importation Counterfoil validated by U.S. Customs.

    Once a case number is issued by U.S. Customs and payment received, a receipt referencing the U.S. Customs Case number should be sufficient to discharge the items in the U.S.

    If the Carnet has already expired, contact the U.S. Customs Claim Examiner at USCIB Headquarters to see if a claim for duties has already been issued by U.S. Customs or to have a claim issued for the items not re-exported.

    Please note that effective February 2011, the port of JFK International Airport has ceased to accept anticipatory breaches of Carnets and will only accept such requests after Carnet expiration.

  5. Are there restrictions on items with jade and rubies from Myanmar?
    Yes, as of 1 October 2008, no rubies or jaderie of Burmese origin may be imported into the US, whether mounted or unmounted. Any such shipments will be seized upon importation by US Customs.
  6. Can I bring a vehicle into the U.S. under a foreign-issued Carnet?
    If your Vehicle will be used as a sample (show/exhibit) or professional equipment (driven in a race/rally), you may import it into the U.S. temporarily under Carnet. If it will be driven on the roads, the vehicle will need to conform to DOT (Department of Transportation) and EPA (Environment Protection Agency) emissions standards prior to importation, unless it is a non-conforming vehicle: please see a licensed customs broker/forwarder for details. Please note also that U.S. Customs ports have their own policies regarding the acceptance of vehicles under Carnet.
  7. I am checking my Carnet goods with my baggage to leave the U.S. Where do I get my Carnet stamped?
    Present your Carnet and goods to U.S. Customs before checking in your baggage and boarding your flight, even if it connects at another U.S. city. U.S. Customs and Border Protection has recently ruled that Carnets should be stamped out of the U.S. (export or re-export) where the Carnet holder last had control of the goods and is not able to come into contact with them until they have arrived at the final foreign destination.For example, a Canadian company participates in a trade show in Las Vegas with goods under an ATA Carnet. When departing Las Vegas, the Carnet goods will connect through Los Angeles en route to the final destination of Vancouver. In this case, the Carnet holder should present his Carnet and goods at U.S. Customs in Las Vegas for re-export validation before checking in the luggage with the airlines through to Canada.The policy decision by U.S. Customs is based on CBP Directive 3280-013B and Muster Topic (#CCS-FY12-0031) dated 10/17/2011 in conjunction with the Office of Field Operations.

General Information

  1. What do the acronyms ATA and TECRO/AIT represent?
    The initials ATA are an acronym of the French and English words Admission Temporaire/Temporary Admission. TECRO is the acronym for the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the United States (TECRO) and AIT is for the American Institute in Taiwan. They represent the contracting parties to this agreement between the U.S. andTaiwan.
  2. What is the origin of the ATA Carnet System?
    To encourage world trade by reducing the obstacles caused byvarying national customs regulations, the Customs Co-operation Council, now the World Customs Organization adopted in December, 1961, the “Customs Convention on the ATA Carnet for the Temporary Admission of Goods.” Carnets are issued and guaranteed by national groups, which administer the ATA Carnet System under a set of conditions established by the International Bureau of Chambers of Commerce (IBCC). The IBCC is sponsored by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) in Paris. Customs authorities in over 85 countries and territories accept the Carnet as a guarantee that all duties and taxes will be paid if the Carnet is misused.The U.S. Council for International Business has managed the ATA Carnet System in the United States since its appointment by the U.S. Customs Service in 1968. The U.S. issues over 17,000 Carnets per year, covering goods valued at over 2 billion dollars.
  3. How do I learn about Carnets around the world?
    Visit the website of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), www.iccwbo.org.
  4. How does the new Electronic Export Information filing requirement impact your ATA Carnet?
    Effective April 5, 2014, and as a result of changes to the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR), many exemptions that existed for ATA Carnet are greatly curtailed. These changes cover both U.S. and foreign ATA Carnets, as well as those coming from and going to Taiwan (TECRO/AIT). For a complete guide to the new FTR export requirements click here.

Carnet and Export Related Information

Carnets

 

Export

U.S. Federal Government

  1. U.S. Commerce Department
  2. U.S. State Department
  3. U.S. Treasury Department
  4. U.S. Department of Homeland Security
  5. Export-Import Bank
  6. Small Business Administration (SBA)
  7. SBA’s Export Planner
  8. Overseas Private Investment Corp.

Intergovernmental Organizations

  • International Standards Organisation (ISO)
  • World Customs Organization (WCO)
  • World Trade Organization (WTO)

Other Trade Services

The Reading Room

Airports – East Coast

 

For international travel, except to Canada, it is recommended that you arrive at the airport four (4) hours before departure.

The information below is subject to change. It is the traveler’s responsibility to confirm customs office location and availability.

 

JFK Airport

For weekend travel, go to the International Arrivals Terminal. To have Carnets validated between the hours of midnight and 8:00am, call (718)-553-1647 to set up an appointment.

To validate a Carnet the day before departure, go to US CBP-Public Response Window at Bldg 77, 2nd floor Tel: (718) 487-2714
LocationPhone #Office Hours

International Arrivals Terminal

Terminal 4
718-553-164724 Hours

Delta

International Flights
US CBP – Ships Office, Terminal 3
718-632-68049:00am-midnight

Early morning flight:
6:00am-midnight

British Airways

US CBP – Ships Office, Terminal 7
718-553-17261:00pm-9:00pm

Early morning flight:
6:00am-9:00pm

American Airlines

US CBP – Ships Office, Terminal 8
718-487-68736:00am-11:00pm

Air France, Japan Airlines, Korean Airlines, Luthansa, Turkish Airlines

Terminal 1 (new building)
718-751-1278Open during the hours between the first and the last flight.

Public Response Window

Bldg 77, 2nd floor
At Rockway Blvd. and Guy Brewer, near Main Post Office, Bldg 250
718-487-27146:00am-midnight

US CBP Cargo

718-487-26918:00am-5:00pm
 

LaGuardia Airport

It’s required to set up an appointment for Carnet Validation. Call the US CBP-Ships Office at: 718 476-4822, leave a message and a CBP officer will respond.
LocationPhone #Office Hours

US CBP – Ships Office

Located in the Air Canada Cargo terminal
718-476-4822

347-245-2005
8:30am- 9:30 pm or last flight
 

Newark Airport

LocationPhone #Office Hours

US CBP – Ships Office

Terminal B, Arrival Hall, Ground Floor
973-565-80007:00am-11:00pm
Entry Team 2E1 email:
Cbp.ny-nwkprobres@dhs.gov
973-368-68208:00am-9:30 pm
 

Miami Air Cargo

For information regarding CBP, Miami Air Cargo please contact 305-869-2740 or 305-869-2750

Industry Kiosk

Air Shows

World Wide Air Shows
Aircraft Interiors Expo Americas
World Travel Catering & Onboard Services Expo (WTCE)
Helitech

Fashion

Reading Room

www.wwd.com
www.apparelnews.net
www.fashionlines.com

Film

National film commissions address the use of Carnet. See what they have to say:

Reading Room

www.variety.com
www.euro-pacific.com
http://www.cinematography.net/

Jewelry

Reading Room

www.jckgroup.com
www.modernjeweler.com
www.national-jeweler.com

Performing Arts

Carnets ease headaches for temporary exports

Carnet Materials

Top Ten Reasons to Use the Jewelry Passport
Speed through Customs
Selling the American Look

Carnet Usage: Upon Return to the U.S.

Departing the US  |  Entering a Country  | Departing a CountryRe-Entering the US
Transiting a Country  | Upon Return | Advisories  |  Glossary

 

  1. Your Carnet is the property of the USCIB.  Upon completion of the final trip, the ORIGINAL Carnet, together with all used and unused certificates MUST be returned to USCIB.
  2. Make a copy of all the pages of the Carnet for your records.
  3. Send the original Carnet via receipted mail to USCIB, Carnet Redemption Department, 1212 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10036.