USCIB Urges Ongoing US-China Negotiations

Washington, D.C., August 13, 2019 – In response to President Trump’s announcement earlier today to delay implementation of a ten percent tariff on imports from China, the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most successful global companies, urged the U.S. and China to continue negotiations toward a comprehensive agreement.

“Simply delaying harmful tariffs on a select number of particularly impacted products from September 1 to December 15 is not a solution,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “It is crucial for the United States and China to engage in continuous discussions in order to reach a negotiated outcome with the goal of removing these tariffs and eliminating market barriers and discrimination.”

Robinson noted that American business continues to have major problems with China’s commercial policies and urged the Trump administration to work more closely with key U.S. trading partners and with the business community to address serious Chinese trade abuses, including referring U.S. complaints to the World Trade Organization.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043, jhuneke@uscib.org

Nobody Wins in Escalation of U.S.-China Trade Fight, Says USCIB

Washington, D.C., May 8, 2019 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most successful global companies, appealed to the United States and China to ratchet down their trade fight in the wake of President Trump‘s decision to increase duties on some $200 billion of Chinese exports from 10 percent to 25 percent.

“When the U.S. and China fight, nobody wins, as the past year’s market gyrations, lost deals, and strained diplomatic ties have made abundantly clear,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “American business continues to have major problems with China’s commercial policies, but we simply must find a way to tackle these that doesn’t turn our most competitive companies into collateral damage.”

Robinson continued: “The earlier rounds of tariffs, coupled with China’s retaliatory measures, are already a significant strain on U.S. consumers, and on the economy as a whole. This latest U.S. escalation, and the inevitable Chinese response will impose considerable additional strains on our exporters and on companies, workers and communities that rely on international trade to succeed.”

Robinson urged the Trump administration to work more closely with key U.S. trading partners and with the business community to address serious Chinese trade abuses, including referring U.S. complaints to the World Trade Organization.

“The U.S. has won some important victories, including against discriminatory Chinese practices and policies, in the WTO lately,” he noted. “We should use the multilateral platform as it was intended to be used, to defuse escalating trade tensions, and to end the uncertainty that is rattling markets and fraying the nerves of both business owners and consumers.”

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
jhuneke@uscib.org, +1 212.703.5043

Application of ATA Carnet System Expands in China

New York, N.Y., January 23, 2019 – China has significantly expanded its use of ATA Carnets for the temporary, duty-free importation of various types of goods. As of January 9, the country is now accepting the widely used “merchandise passports” for professional equipment and product samples, according to the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which administers the ATA system in the United States.

Previously the country honored ATA Carnets just for goods destined for trade shows and exhibitions. China also extended the period for which goods may be brought into the country under ATA Carnets to a full year, from six months as had previously been the case.

“We expect China’s decision to accept Carnets for the full range of uses to significantly expand American exports to the country,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “Carnet usage is often a leading indicator of future exports, and this move will make the process of getting goods to and from the country much smoother.”

ATA Carnets are internationally recognized customs documents that allow for the temporary importation of various types of goods, duty-free and tax-free, generally for up to one year. They are used by a wide variety of exporters and businesses as a simple, cost-effective means of moving goods temporarily to 78 countries and customs territories around the world. Additional information on developments related to the use of ATA Carnets in China is available on USCIB’s website here.

The worldwide ATA Carnet system is overseen by the World Customs Organization and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), for which USCIB serves as the American national committee. Find out more about the services offered by USCIB to facilitate cross-border trade and investment at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP communications, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

About USCIB:
The United States Council for International Business (USCIB) promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide.

As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, including ICC, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide. USCIB also works to facilitate international trade and investment. It is the U.S. national guaranteeing association for ATA Carnets, which enable the temporary export of many types of goods, free of import duties or taxes, for up to one year.

USCIB: De-Escalate US-China Trade Conflict Now

Washington, D.C., July 6, 2018 – Responding to the latest round of tit-for-tat tariffs from the United States and China, the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most competitive global companies, reiterated its call for the two countries to back away from an all-out trade war, urging them to take immediate steps to mediate the conflict through the World Trade Organization.

“Our members are already feeling the impact of earlier tariffs, in the form of rising costs and operational disruptions, and these latest moves will only make matters worse,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson. “We can expect further damage to the U.S. economy, workers, companies and consumers.

“While we appreciate the goal of the Trump administration to force the Chinese side to make concessions on its poor treatment of U.S. companies, we believe these tariffs will not have the desired effect. Rather, they will negatively impact the American economy and workforce, even if they are maintained for just a short time.”

Robinson continued: “The American business community is united in its belief that joint action, not unilateral escalation, is the best path to address important structural problems with China’s unfair trading behavior. We should be working with our allies, including via the WTO, to apply pressure on China in ways that do not unnecessarily harm U.S. farmers, workers, consumers and companies.

“USCIB calls upon the U.S. government, its allies and the Chinese government to develop a workable, measurable action plan for eliminating the trade barriers China has erected. This plan should contain benchmarks that are tied to penalties if China doesn’t stick to the agreement, but penalties that encourage China to do the right thing without burdening American businesses, workers and consumers in the process.”

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
jhuneke@uscib.org, +1 212.703.5043

Time to De-Escalate U.S.-China Trade Conflict, Says USCIB

President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping at last year’s G20 Summit in Germany (White House photo)

Washington, D.C., April 6, 2018 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s top global companies, is urging the U.S. and China to take steps to de-escalate their trade conflict. Responding to statements by President Trump and China’s commerce ministry over the past 24 hours, USCIB said both parties should seek to resolve their differences via established bilateral and multilateral mechanisms.

“China’s unfair trade practices and its mistreatment of U.S. and other foreign companies are serious problems,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson. “But an escalating, tit-for-tat trade war is not the way to solve them, and risks doing serious harm to the American and global economies.”

Robinson said both sides should seek to work constructively, tone down their rhetoric, and step back from threats to impose new trade barriers, which he said could rattle international markets, imperil future growth prospects and damage the global trading system. He urged the U.S. to use the multilateral mechanisms it has helped build over the years to defuse a looming crisis.

“We should be working with our allies, with other major trading nations, and via the World Trade Organization to apply pressure on China in a way that does not boomerang back to hurt U.S. farmers, workers, consumers and companies.”

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
jhuneke@uscib.org, +1 212.703.5043

USCIB Urges US and China to Avoid Trade War

Washington, D.C., March 22, 2018 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most successful global companies, responded to the Trump administration’s plans to impose tariffs on billions of dollars of Chinese exports along with restrictions on Chinese investment in the United States. USCIB expressed continued concern over Beijing’s trade abuses while also urging the administration to tread carefully to avoid a trade war.

“We support the goal of getting China to stop its unfair trade practices and treatment of U.S. intellectual property,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson. “We are encouraged to see that the administration is considering a range of tools in addressing these concerns, including WTO dispute settlement. However, we remain concerned that potential new U.S. measures and Chinese retaliation will hurt American companies, workers, farmers and consumers.“

President Trump today announced his intention to impose tariffs on some $50 billion of exports from China under Section 301 of the 1974 trade act, in response to intellectual property violations and other trade abuses. Specifically, he instructed the office of the U.S. Trade Representative to publish, within 15 days, a list of proposed Chinese goods that could be subject to tariffs, while the Treasury Department will have 60 days to recommend steps to restrict Chinese investment in the United States.

“It’s been said that nobody wins a trade war,” Robinson added. “That would be especially true of a trade conflict between the world’s two largest economies. Escalation of the current dispute would severely impact our members, who rely on sales in both markets and who maintain complex global supply chains encompassing both countries as well as many others. These overseas sales and supply chains support millions of jobs in the United States.”

Robinson concluded: “We therefore urge the Trump administration to carefully consider the actions it takes pursuant to this Section 301 report, and we encourage both governments to work together to resolve these unfair trade practices before taking steps that will damage both economies.”

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
jhuneke@uscib.org, +1 212.703.5043

Global Business Encourages China to Lead on Environmental Goods Agreement

Solar-workers_3Washington, D.C., July 8, 2016 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB) joined dozens of international business organizations in urging the Chinese government to take a leadership role in concluding an ambitious Environmental Goods Agreement (EGA) this year. A concluded EGA, which is being negotiated under the umbrella of the World Trade Organization (WTO) among 17 WTO members, including the United States and China, would eliminate tariffs on a wide range of environmental goods and technologies.

“China has taken an increasing interest in playing a global leadership role on energy and environmental issues,” USCIB and other business organizations stated in a letter to Chinese government officials on June 8. “As this year’s host of the G20, China has a golden opportunity to lead the successful conclusion of the EGA by the 2016 G20 Hangzhou summit in September.” The G20 Trade Ministers are meeting in Shanghai this weekend.

The letter notes that as the largest producer of green technologies among EGA members, China has much to gain from a concluded agreement. A recent study found that the agreement would increase China’s exports by $27 billion as well as result in substantial economic benefits linked to improved environmental quality.

“We strongly urge China to demonstrate leadership that results in the conclusion of a commercially meaningful EGA this year,” the letter stated. “A concluded agreement would promote economic growth, improve environmental outcomes and advance innovation not only in China, but also around the world.”

Read the entire letter

Read more about USCIB’s China Committee

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP communications, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Business Urges U.S., China to Minimize Tech Economy Barriers

Computers_loresNew York, N.Y., August 12, 2015 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB) has joined leading American business and technology groups in urging President Obama to use his upcoming summit with Chinese President Xi Jinping to improve the bilateral relationship for the U.S. information and communications technology (ICT) sector.

In a joint letter, the groups noted that the two countries have, for nearly four decades, “consistently pursued a mutually beneficial policy of encouraging economic openness and reducing barriers to bilateral trade and investment, including in the ICT sector.” But they said the benefits of that cooperation “are now at risk, as a result of increasing and proliferating threats to national cyber-security as well as China’s approach to defining its national security interests.”

The business groups said that, since the last U.S.-China summit in November 2014, China has “increasingly pursued policies that have adversely affected the ability of U.S. ICT firms to do business in China.” They called on the two countries to reaffirm their commitments to open markets, particularly in the ICT sector.

The groups also urged the U.S. and China to ensure that measures to protect national security affecting the ICT sector are necessary, narrowly-focused and minimize disruption to open trade and competition.

The full text of the industry letter is available at https://www.uscib.org/uscib-content/uploads/2015/08/2015_08_11_china_ict_letter.pdf.

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 917.420.0039, jhuneke@uscib.org

USCIB Applauds Progress at US-China Strategic & Economic Dialogue

New York, N.Y., May 4, 2012 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB) hailed progress made on several fronts at the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED) talks in Beijing this week.  USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson said the two countries had demonstrated a “commitment to strengthen and deepen our business and economic ties,” and applauded in particular plans to negotiate a bilateral investment treaty (BIT).

According to the U.S. Treasury Department, the economic track of this week’s S&ED talks resulted in several important developments for American business, including:

  • agreement to intensify negotiations of a U.S.-China BIT
  • China’s commitment to provide non-discriminatory treatment to all enterprises, including state-owned enterprises (SOEs), in terms of credit, taxation and regulatory policies
  • agreement by China to take part in international talks to develop new rules on export financing, increase transparency in rule-making, and open up new sectors to foreign investment
  • China’s pledge to take steps to join the WTO Government Procurement Agreement.

“Taken together, these commitments could go a long way toward addressing some of the U.S. business community’s major concerns,” Robinson said.  “As an organization that seeks to promote trade, investment and regulatory coherence between the U.S. and the rest of the world, we are especially pleased with the decision to enter into BIT negotiations and address the SOEs issue.  We commend the U.S. and Chinese government for demonstrating their commitment to strengthen and deepen our business and economic ties.”

USCIB has been a leading American business voice urging the two governments to negotiate a strong, comprehensive BIT.  Last month USCIB welcomed the release of a revised U.S. model bilateral investment treaty.  “BITs are important tools to open overseas markets for U.S. companies, and they help drive U.S. exports and jobs in an increasingly competitive global marketplace,” Robinson said at the time.  “We are glad to see the U.S. getting back in the game, to ensure that we don’t fall behind our competitors in terms of investment protections.”

USCIB has also pressed for new international disciplines to ensure competitive neutrality for SOEs vis-à-vis their private-sector counterparts, including in third markets, and is working with the U.S. and other governments to address the issue in the Trans-Pacific Partnership talks and in the OECD.

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and prudent regulation.  Its members include top U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world.  With a unique global network encompassing the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and the Business and Industry Advisory Committee to the OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment.  More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP communications, USCIB
(212) 703-5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

More on USCIB’s China Committee

More on USCIB’s Trade and Investment Committee

Business Urges Attention to Ongoing US-China Market Access Concerns

4250_image002New York, N.Y., February 14, 2012 – As this week’s visit by Vice President Xi Jinping focuses attention on the complexity of U.S. relations with China, the United States Council for International Business (USCIB) is urging leaders from both countries to tackle important commercial and economic matters in order to keep this mutually beneficial relationship on an even keel.

 “The U.S.-China relationship extends across an array of geopolitical as well as economic issues, and our economies are now deeply intertwined,” stated USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson.  “On balance, it provides significant benefits for both countries.  However, there remain too many commercial and economic issues handicapping the ability of American firms to compete in China and in third markets, thereby placing our workers at a disadvantage and impeding progress on the overall relationship.  These need to be urgently addressed.”

Mr. Robinson said major trade and investment priorities for American companies in China include, but are not limited to:

  • improving market access for key industries
  • resolving longstanding currency disputes
  • improving protection of intellectual property rights, and
  • ensuring competitive neutrality for state-owned enterprises.

“We urge the two governments to focus on resolving these issues through diplomatic means, both bilateral and multilateral, and to reinforce existing forums like the WTO, the Strategic and Economic Dialogue, and the Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade,” he said.

The USCIB president noted recent progress by China toward closer bilateral ties with other countries, including last week’s signature of a trade and investment agreement with Canada.  “We should be looking seriously at developing new agreements, such as a bilateral investment treaty (BIT) with China,” said Mr. Robinson.  “These could ensure continued liberalization of key markets and provide important security to American investments in the country.  Absent such agreements, American companies and workers could be disadvantaged when competing in China with companies from countries already benefitting from such agreements.  We shouldn’t be sitting on the sidelines.”

Mr. Robinson also called attention to an October USCIB statement on China’s compliance with its WTO accession commitments.  “As we noted in that statement, China has made important progress, but much work remains.  Priority issues include improving transparency in China’s regulatory environment, the need for fair and independent regulators, greater market access, non-discriminatory treatment and inadequate intellectual property laws.  We urge the U.S. and Chinese governments to take up these issues on a priority basis, and we stand ready to provide business views to help ensure a fully informed discussion.”

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and prudent regulation.  Its members include top U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world.  With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment.  More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:

Jonathan Huneke, VP communications, USCIB

(212) 703-5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org.

More on USCIB’s China Committee

More on USCIB’s Trade and Investment Committee