New Business Partnership for Sustainable Development Launched

USCIB Vice President Michael Michener (left) and BPSD Executive Director Scott Ratzan at the New York launch event

New York, N.Y., July 17, 2019 – The USCIB Foundation, Inc., an educational and research foundation affiliated with the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), today announced the launch of Business Partners for Sustainable Development (BPSD).

BPSD will create new international public-private partnerships in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It will provide a framework for government, business and civil society to share information, resources, activities and capabilities, and work in collaboration to achieve objectives together that the sectors cannot achieve independently. BPSD will facilitate partnerships, identify creative solutions, leverage proven strategies, measure progress and report results.

All BPSD initiatives will be based on four pillars of partnership:

  • Inclusion: Bringing together all stakeholders to establish accountability, shared risk and mutually beneficial objectives.
  • Innovation: Fostering forward thinking, collaborative solutions and imaginative partnership strategies for implementation.
  • Influence: Leveraging thought leadership and digital resources to promote the role, explain the benefits and achieve the impact of multisector engagement on achieving the SDGs.
  • Impact: Adapting or developing credible techniques for measuring, monitoring and evaluating the impact of public private partnerships.

“We want BPSD to be an important step forward in facilitating successful and impactful public private partnerships to achieve the SDGs,” According to Michael Michener, USCIB’s vice president for product policy and innovation.

Dr. Scott Ratzan will serve as executive director of BPSD. Ratzan will serve in a part-time leadership role developing the strategic priorities for the center, directing its initial activities and advancing the visibility of the BPSD within multilateral organizations and the U.S. government.

“Scott Ratzan brings extensive experience and keen insight for setting the future direction of BPSD to achieve the SDGs,” stated USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “I am honored to join in a leadership capacity to advance this important mission,” said Ratzan. BPSD will be a leader and an innovator in advancing successful and impactful public private partnerships to achieve the SDGs.”

Ratzan recently served as senior fellow at Mossavar Rahmani Center for Business & Government, Harvard Kennedy School. He has multi-sector program experience with AB InBev, Johnson & Johnson, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and a number of leading academic institutions.

At Harvard, Ratzan led a team where he developed Guiding Principles for Multisector Engagement for Sustainable Health, building upon experience from a number of partnerships he pioneered including Together for Safer Roads, Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action, Global Smokefree Worksite Challenge. and the Global Smart Drinking Goals. Ratzan also served as CoChair of the UN Secretary General’s Every Woman Every Child Innovation Working Group, as Vice Chair of the Business Industry Advisory Council’s Health Committee to the OECD and also on the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Health & Well-being.

About The USCIB Foundation, Inc.: Since 1980, The USCIB Foundation has been dedicated to a single mission: advancing the benefits of a free market economy and promoting the essential role of the private sector in stimulating economic growth and progress in social development. Today, the Foundation pursues that mission through a portfolio of initiatives that strives to inform future choices made by stakeholders and policy makers that benefit people around the world.

About USCIB: USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment.

USCIB Statement on U.S. Withdrawal From the UN Human Rights Council

U.S. Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley (credit: U.S. Mission to the UN)

New York, N.Y., June 20, 2018 – The United States Council for International Business, which represents the views of the American private sector to major multilateral organizations, international forums and national governments, issued the following statement regarding the U.S. decision to withdraw from the United Nations Human Rights Council as well as the separation of families at the southern border:

“We are disappointed that the United States has chosen to withdraw from the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC). While we agree with the Administration and Ambassador Nikki Haley that the Council is badly in need of reform, this can only come about through continued, direct and vigorous engagement by the United States, working with allies, civil society groups and representatives of the private sector.

“We urge the United States to reconsider this decision. In the meantime, USCIB and its global business partners will continue to represent the views of the private sector on matters affecting American business in the UNHRC and other international forums. USCIB will also continue its cooperation with the Administration to represent U.S. business interests on social and human rights issues across the United Nations system, including in the ILO.

“USCIB members are strongly committed to human rights. We will continue to advocate for both governments’ duty to protect and corporate responsibility to respect human rights, in line with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

“Lastly, especially in the context of U.S. withdrawal from the UNHRC, harmful U.S. action to separate children of illegal immigrants apprehended at our southern border from their families is contrary to American values. Such troubling practices at home risk calling into question U.S. leadership and dedication to upholding human rights. We are hopeful that President Trump, as he has pledged to do, will address this issue via executive order and reunite these families without delay.”

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP Communications
+1 212.703.5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

 

USCIB Statement on US Withdrawal From Global Compact on Migration

New York, NY, December 4, 2017 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most successful global companies, issued the following statement on U.S. withdrawal from negotiations surrounding the UN Global Compact on Migration:

Like many others in the U.S. business community, USCIB is disappointed by the news that the Administration has elected to withdraw from the UN Global Compact on Migration, which aims to enlist international cooperation to ensure the rights of migrants and refugees, including dissemination of best practices surrounding their access to education and jobs. This non-binding instrument is currently under negotiation and due to be adopted next year.

The U.S. business community regards migration as a positive and necessary phenomenon. It is a vehicle for fulfilling personal aspirations, for balancing labor supply and demand, for supporting competitiveness and sparking innovation, and for transferring and spreading skills.

Companies are frequent and important users of national migration systems. To remain successful and competitive in the global economy, they require clear and consistent migration policies, national laws and procedures in both sending and receiving countries.

The U.S. has benefited immeasurably from the contribution of migrants to our economy and our society. As the home to the largest number of migrants in the world, our government has experience with the practical workings of immigration laws, procedures, and policies that can contribute to a positive international dialogue. Without U.S. leadership, we fear an opportunity will be missed to ensure clear, transparent, and efficient national immigration laws and policies in the U.S. and around the world that permit the movement of workers when and where they are needed.

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S-based global companies and professional service firms from every sector of the economy, with operations in every region of the world. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, including the International Organization of Employers (IOE), USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, including through the Business Mechanism to the Global Forum on Migration and Development (GFMD).

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043, jhuneke@uscib.org

Business Makes It Happen: UNGA Week Events Spotlight the Private Sector’s Role in Sustainable Development

New York, N.Y., September 13, 2017 – As United Nations members gather in New York to review progress on the UN’s ambitious 2030 Development Agenda, American business is underscoring how much it is doing – and could be doing, provided the proper incentives – in support of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most innovative and successful global companies, plans a series of events in New York throughout the week of September 18, centered on the theme: “Business makes it happen.”

“This is an important moment for the SDGs and for the UN family,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson. “Throughout the negotiations leading to the SDGs, and now in the period of their execution, we have underscored the need for business to be embedded in the process. This is necessary to leverage all the resources that the private sector can provide through investment, innovation and know-how. With dialogue and the right mix of incentives, business really can make it happen.”

Events the week of September 18 include:

  • Rethinking Collaboration for the SDGs, September 18 at Barclays, 745 Seventh Avenue. USCIB will join forces with Business Fights Poverty to co-host this action-focused half-day event on how business, government and civil society are collaborating to deliver the Sustainable Development Goals. USCIB’s Robinson and several USCIB members are among the speakers.
  • Data Analytics for SDGs and National Reports, September 19 at KPMG, 345 Park Avenue. Experts from USCIB member companies will present and discuss private sector frameworks for data analytics on SDG implementation, and consider opportunities for synergy with national reports for more targeted and comprehensive UN discussion and action.
  • Going Further Together for Shared Impact: U.S. Public-Private Partnerships for Sustainable Development, September 21 at Deloitte, 30 Rockefeller Plaza. USCIB member companies and government partners will present and discuss examples of public-private sector partnership to advance the SDGs, with a view to expanding those working relationships and improving and scaling up efforts for shared impact and benefit.
  • USCIB Side Event, Business Makes It Happen, September 22 at Pfizer, 235 East 42nd Street. This wrap-up event will present the main recommendations and initiatives identified during UNGA week, and discuss next steps on the intersection of UN reform and the SDGs, scaling up investment in infrastructure, public-private partnerships and institutional evolution needed to catalyze business involvement to advance SDGs.

In 2015, USCIB launched Business for 2030, an ambitious effort to catalogue and catalyze company efforts to support the SDGs. The site has quickly become a go-to resource for all stakeholders interested in the SDGs to learn about what the global business community is doing to help achieve them. Business for 2030 now showcases 187 initiatives from 49 companies, in over 150 countries, covering 83 of the 169 SDG targets. These encompass both philanthropic corporate responsibility initiatives as well as core business operations that all contribute to achieving one or more of the 17 SDG targets.

“Innovation, infrastructure, economic growth and empowerment and good governance are the four inter-linked cornerstones for all 17 SDGs for business,” stated Norine Kennedy, USCIB’s vice president for strategic international engagement, energy and environment. “Therefore, it is crucial to consult with private-sector groups at the national and regional level to develop enabling frameworks for business actions to advance the SDGs.”

The latest list of UNGA week events organized by USCIB is available here.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
Tel: +1 917 420 0039
jhuneke@uscib.org

USCIB Statement on U.S. Withdrawal From the Paris Climate Agreement

New York, N.Y., June 1, 2017 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most successful global companies, issued the following statement on U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement:

“Like many others in the U.S. business community, USCIB is disappointed by the news that the Trump administration has elected to leave the Paris Climate Agreement. In our view, this decision could leave U.S. companies unprotected and exposed to possible discrimination under the Paris Agreement if the U.S. government is not at the table.

“The Paris Agreement is redefining global markets for energy and environmental goods and services, as well as providing major economic stimuli for companies. U.S. energy security and access were never threatened by the Paris Agreement, which allows each national government to define its own climate action plan. Moreover, the U.S. stands to benefit from trade and investment opportunities that the Paris Agreement will set in motion.

“We are interested to learn more about how the U.S. will pursue new arrangements while remaining in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. While it does so, we encourage the U.S. to stay involved on behalf of U.S. economic interests, and to bring U.S. solutions to this crucial global effort. We encourage the administration to reform areas of the UN climate framework toward more fair, transparent and balanced approaches that are responsive to U.S. circumstances and aspirations.

“USCIB members are committed to advancing sustainable development and environmental solutions through international cooperation, and have supported the UNFCCC and the Paris Agreement since their inception. Multilateral forums and cooperative approaches are the best way to address the transboundary challenges of energy access and innovation, climate change and sustainable development. In close coordination with our global business partners, including the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) and the Major Economies Business Forum (BizMEF), USCIB will continue to champion U.S. business interests in the UNFCCC, and will seek opportunities to promote U.S. environment and energy solutions through business engagement and implementation, and to broadly deploy climate-friendly investment and innovation.

“USCIB has represented U.S. business interests in the UN climate negotiations for over 25 years, and during that time has benefited from the diligent efforts of U.S. government representatives at the table to advance and defend U.S. business interests, often under challenging conditions. We express thanks to the current U.S. climate negotiating team, and others with whom we have worked, for their extraordinary efforts on our behalf.”

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, including ICC, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
Tel: +1 212 703 5043
jhuneke@uscib.org

USCIB Welcomes Selection of Guterres as New UN Secretary General

Mr. Antonio Guterres former United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees addressed the press at the stakeout after the casual meeting with member states
Antonio Guterres of Portugal. UN Photo/Manuel Elias

New York, N.Y., October 7, 2016 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents American business views to the United Nations and other international bodies, applauded the selection of Antonio Guterres of Portugal as the next UN secretary general, succeeding Ban Ki-moon.

“The selection of Prime Minister Guterres is a welcome signal of agreement among Security Council members on the urgent need to address the refugee crisis and other pressing global issues, many of which will require significant input and assistance from the private sector,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson. “His leadership at the helm of the United Nations will be essential to developing robust international frameworks that business needs in order to innovate and thrive.”

The Security Council’s selection of Guterres, the former Portuguese prime minister who served for 10 years as UN high commissioner for refugees, will be formally voted on by the UN General Assembly next week.

USCIB Chairman Harold McGraw III, who also serves as honorary chairman of the International Chamber of Commerce, added: “The American business community understands the importance of multilateral cooperation, whether on trade, investment or climate change, and we know the UN system is the anchor for this essential collaboration. We look forward to continuing to work in partnership with the UN to successfully address global problems to provide increased economic growth and prosperity across the world.”

Robinson also expressed appreciation for the outgoing UN secretary general’s achievements and dedication to partnering with business. “Throughout the UN deliberations on sustainability and climate change, Secretary General Ban has consistently sought to work with the private sector, recognizing that today’s economic and environmental challenges require private sector solutions and investment,” he said.

Companies of all sizes and from all sectors have already pledged to respond to the refugee crisis through a series of initiatives – from funding campaigns to delivering essential training programs. USCIB’s global network is encouraging companies to do more where they can, based on their own assets and capabilities.

Separately, USCIB welcomed the entry into force of the Paris Agreement, the global pact on climate agreed at last year’s COP21 summit. USCIB and its global business network have provided significant substantive input to the UN climate negotiations since their inception, and they are working to develop a formal channel for private-sector views and solutions to the agreement going forward.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network encompassing the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers, and Business at OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP communications, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

USCIB Proud to Sponsor Global Partnerships Week 2016

Business for 2030

New York, N.Y., March 1, 2016 – The United States Council for International Business is supporting next week’s Global Partnerships Week, an annual series of events in Washington, D.C. on public-private partnerships that for government, business and development professionals, organized by the U.S. Department of State, USAID and Concordia.

“Partnership among diverse stakeholders is essential to achieving the United Nation 2030 Development Agenda and many other shared objectives,” said USCIB Vice President Ariel Meyerstein. We are delighted to provide private-sector business support to this timely and informative series of events.”

USCIB will sponsor a breakout session during the week’s kick-off event on March 7, the Global Practitioners’ Forum as well as the event’s cocktail reception. The panel discussion will focus on “Making the Business Case with Social Metrics,” and will include representatives from USCIB member companies Citi, Microsoft and Nestle.

Global Partnerships Week brings together leaders from the public, private and nonprofit sectors working in diplomacy, development and peace-building to share best practices in the creation and implementation of cross-sector collaborations. This year’s keynote speakers include John Brennan, director of the Central Intelligence Agency, and Abigail Disney, filmmaker and philanthropist.

USCIB’s Business for 2030 web portal serves as a platform for companies and business organizations to showcase partnerships and other activities that advance the UN’s 2030 Development Agenda. Launched last year, the portal features examples of private-sector engagement with the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with the goal of stimulating more productive partnerships between the public and private sectors in support of the SDGs.

“In less than a year, Business for 2030 has grown into a vibrant, trusted and widely recognized platform for the development community,” said Meyerstein. “Thanks to strong support from our members and other stakeholders, we will be further growing the portal throughout 2016.”

USCIB serves as the voice of American business in the UN and other multilateral bodies, primarily through its role as the American affiliate of several global business groups, including the International Chamber of Commerce.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 917.420.0039, jhuneke@uscib.org

More on USCIB’s Corporate Responsibility Committee

New Platform Showcases Business Support for UN’s 2030 Development Agenda

Business for 2030New York, N.Y., September 15, 2015 – As world leaders get set to descend on New York for the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Summit, companies from the United States and around the world are lining up in support of this ambitious and far-reaching effort to transform our world.

Reflecting this commitment, the United States Council for International Business (USCIB) has launched Business for 2030, a new web portal aimed at stimulating more productive partnerships between the public and private sectors in support of the SDGs. USCIB serves as the voice of American business in the UN and other multilateral bodies, primarily through its role as the American affiliate of several global business groups, including the International Chamber of Commerce.

“We wanted to highlight concrete initiatives and partnerships that our members and partners are undertaking to support the 2030 Agenda,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “We believe that Business for 2030 can inspire renewed trust in the private sector, while catalyzing active, sustained business engagement in support of the SDGs.”

The Business for 2030 portal, which will be launched at a September 24 event in Midtown Manhattan, features more than 80 real-world examples of company initiatives and public-private partnerships, organized in relation to over 50 of the business-relevant SDG targets.

The initiative picks up on UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon‘s exhortation for the private sector “to take its place at the table and plot a path forward for the next 15 years, reaffirming once again that responsible business is a force for good.”

At the September 24 launch, USCIB member companies and international business representatives will engage with the broader development community to provide deeper context to a selection of the diverse examples featured on the Business for 2030 web portal. There will be special focus on the critical role of infrastructure in catalyzing progress on the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda, and the need to transform partnerships globally and locally, through enhanced national development strategic planning and coordination for achieving the SDGs.

Participants at the event will include UN member state and secretariat representatives, along with corporate executives and representatives of civil society.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 917.420.0039, jhuneke@uscib.org

More on USCIB’s Corporate Responsibility Committee

Business Urges G20 to Support Private-Sector Led Growth and Job Creation

Two machinists working on machineLeaders of USCIB’s global network have urged G20 governments to pursue an agenda of smarter regulation, labor market flexibility, and eliminating barriers that inhibit entrepreneurs from starting and growing businesses.

Daniel Funes de Rioja, President of the International Organization of Employers (IOE), and Phil O’Reilly, chair of the Business and Industry Advisory Committee (BIAC), addressed the G20 Labor and Employment Ministers in Melbourne on Wednesday as part of the B20 delegation, pointing to the potential of private-sector led growth and job creation.

At the meeting, Steve Sargent, member of the Australian B20 Leadership Group, and coordinating Chair of the B20 Human Capital Task Force, led the business presentations, emphasizing key B20 recommendations including the need for structural flexibility, consistent and effective business regulation and for dismantling the barriers inhibiting entrepreneurs from starting and growing businesses and creating jobs.

Funes de Rioja stressed that the IOE, as a key contributor to the B20, stands firmly behind the B20 recommendations: “What is essential now to encourage business is that governments pursue an agenda of smarter regulation, simpler administrative requirements, and short-term incentives”. He also echoed B20 support for the inclusion of occupational safety and health on the G20 agenda, recommending that national efforts focus on prevention, rather than sanctions. For this, he said, information and accessible advisory services were needed, especially for SMEs, citing the Promotional Framework for Occupational Safety & Health Convention 187 of the International Labor Organization as a useful tool.

O’ Reilly urged governments to “remove restrictions on businesses offering different types of employment arrangements in response to changing needs”. Referring to the newly-released joint IOE-BIAC (Business and Industry Advisory Committee) monitoring report, he encouraged G20 to improve on the implementation of policy commitments. “What is important is that actions lead to positive results, and we call on governments to move forward with bold reform measures based on the commitments made in the G20 labor process”. He also cited the Global Apprenticeships Network, a business initiative led by companies and representative business organizations to promote quality apprenticeships, adding that “Government dialogue and engagement in these efforts is critical to success.”

More on USCIB’s Corporate Responsibility and Labor Affairs Committee

IOE President Promotes Youth Employment at G20

IOE factsheet_IOE at a glance eng v_09.inddMore than 75 million youth are unemployed worldwide. Long-term youth unemployment increases the risk of social exclusion well into adulthood and poses broader threats to national productivity, growth and development.

Addressing a B20 Roundtable in Melbourne, Australia on September 9, Daniel Funes de Rioja, president of the International Organization of Employers, called for key actions governments can take to bring about the right conditions for job creation. As a participant in the B20 Human Capital Taskforce, he underscored two areas he particularly wanted to see addressed: structural reform to enhance labor market flexibility and better alignment between prospective employees’ education and the needs of business.

Funes de Rioja also reminded the audience of the part played by the business community in youth workforce development with the launch of the Global Apprenticeships Network (GAN), a coalition of companies that offers apprenticeships to young workers and shares youth employment best practices with other companies and labor administrations.

“Government reforms in both areas are needed in order to open up opportunities for newcomers to enter the labor market, to allow companies to adapt in line with demand, and restore their confidence to hire,” he said. “To date, we have seen progress in terms of implementation of measures to align skills training with labor market needs.” But he added, “focusing on the supply side alone will not bring about a labor market that meets the needs of employers and workers in the 21st century.”

In June 2013, the B20 and L20 reached consensus on the need for a global apprenticeships network to combat long-term youth unemployment. “Global business, through the Business and Industry Advisory Committee to the OECD and the IOE, has since moved forward with launch of the GAN,” said Ariel Meyerstein, USCIB’s vice president for labor affairs, corporate responsibility and corporate governance. “It’s time for countries to meet business half-way to further incentivize and support apprenticeship programs throughout the G20.”

Funes de Rioja concluded by reiterating the position of the B20 Human Capital Taskforce: “Businesses face structural challenges to increasing employment. Dismantling the regulatory barriers that restrict diverse forms of employment is in the interest of businesses and job seekers alike and we hope the G20 governments will not waver from their commitment in this regard.”

USCIB Supports Ratification of Disability Treaty

4752_image001New York, N.Y., June 10, 2014 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s top global companies, has urged Congress to ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), an international disability treaty that was inspired by U.S. leadership in recognizing the rights of people with disabilities.

The CRDP was modeled after the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and provides a vital framework for creating global policies that embrace the rights of people with disabilities. Ratification of the CPRD allows the U.S. to maintain its leadership role and eliminate disability discrimination around the world.

USCIB signed on with over 800 disability, business and faith organizations that voiced support for the treaty. In a letter addressed to Senate leaders, USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson urged Congress to move expeditiously to ratify the treaty, and underscored how the CRPD strengthens American leadership and benefits business.

“U.S. business has long recognized that policies promoting diversity and non-discrimination in the workplace are important for protecting human rights as well as for purely business reasons,” said Robinson. “Workplace diversity conveys important economic advantages on both companies and the societies in which they do business, including broader talent pools, improved productivity, increased job creation and opening new markets.”

USCIB is a member of the ILO Global Business and Disability Network, a voluntary group of multinational companies, employers’ organizations, business networks and disabled persons’ organizations who share the conviction that people with disabilities have talents and skills that can enhance virtually any workplace. USCIB Senior Counsel Ronnie Goldberg serves on the network’s steering committee.

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and prudent regulation. Its members include top U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment.  More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:

Jonathan Huneke, VP communications, USCIB

(212) 703-5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

 

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