USCIB Applauds Launch of Trade and Technology Council (TTC), Urges Timely Conclusion of New Privacy Shield Framework

Washington D.C., September 21, 2021—The U.S. Council for International Business (USCIB), a cross-sectoral trade association of companies active in transatlantic business, welcomes the cooperative spirit underlying the U.S.-EU Trade and Technology Council (TTC), which will be formally launched on September 29 in Pittsburgh, PA.

The TTC’s aims to grow bilateral trade and investment, strengthen global cooperation on technology and digital issues, boost innovation, collaborate on supply chain resilience, and realize greater regulatory interoperability, among other goals set forth in the July 15 EU-U.S. Summit communique, all of which are critical to fully reaping the economic and social welfare benefits of digital transformation.

Achieving the TTC goals, however, will be difficult unless a new agreement establishing a durable legal basis and privacy protections for transatlantic data flows is concluded as soon as possible. This accord is essential to the U.S.-EU economic and diplomatic partnerships and, importantly, will enable innumerable gains to be realized under the TTC process.

As USCIB and some twenty-two U.S. and EU business groups underscored in a July 14 letter to U.S. Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo and European Commissioner for Justice Didier Reynders, thousands of EU and U.S. companies continue to be harmed by the resulting legal uncertainty for transatlantic data transfers stemming from EU Court of Justice invalidation of Privacy Shield Framework in July 2020. Differing interpretations of the Court ruling risk triggering additional compliance and operational challenges as well as limit opportunities for EU businesses to grow and innovate internationally.

USCIB therefore urges timely conclusion of a sustainable framework for secure transatlantic data flows in the coming weeks. This will provide the necessary foundation upon which the TTC can effectively realize its goals, while ensuring that U.S. and EU companies active in the transatlantic commercial space can thrive again. We look forward to positive news from the U.S. and European Commission soon.

About USCIB

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development, and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the International Organization of Employers (IOE) and Business at OECD (BIAC), USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org

Digital Economy Architects to Keynote at Joint OECD, Business at OECD and USCIB Conference

New York, N.Y., March 16, 2021 — For the past year, the COVID-19 pandemic has required us to conduct our lives virtually and has, subsequently, highlighted the relevance of the OECD’s Internet Policy Principles (IPPs). These principles call for a global free flow of information and services, multistakeholder participation, and cooperation to ensure Internet security and privacy. With these issues in mind, USCIB joined with the OECD and Business at OECD (BIAC) to organize a Digital Economy Conference focusing on “A Decade of OECD Internet Principles: Policy-Making in a Data-Driven World.” Key experts, such as MIT’s Daniel Weitzner, Microsoft’s Julie Brill, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce Christopher Hoff, Ambassador David Gross of Wiley, and Sharri Clark from the White House, as well as OECD’s Andrew Wyckoff, among others, will discuss the evolving digital ecosystem, Artificial Intelligence (AI), government access to data, and challenges to both business and policymakers.

“The IPPs, adopted in 2011, have underpinned the OECD’s evolving work on digital economy issues in the past decade,” said USCIB Vice President for ICT Policy Barbara Wanner. “These themes have also been echoed in recent digital economy work of the United Nations, the UN Internet Governance Forum, and other multilateral bodies.”

The May 25 virtual conference, officially the “Joseph H. Alhadeff Digital Economy Conference,” will consider how the IPPs have been reflected in some of the OECD’s ground-breaking digital work – such as development of the AI Principles. Industry experts will also consider how the Principles may be employed to address challenges posed by the rapid pace of digital innovation and related changes to the digital ecosystem.

Registration is now open for this conference. Please contact Erin Breitenbucher to register: ebreitenbucher@uscib.org.

Members of the press and media are also welcome to register and join.

About USCIB: USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development, and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD (BIAC), USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Addressing Tax Challenges Arising from Digitalization of the Economy: USCIB Submits Comments to OECD

Washington D.C., December 14, 2020 – The U.S. Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents many of America’s leading global companies, provided comments to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in response to the OECD’s Public Consultation Request to its Reports on the Pillar One and Pillar Two Blueprints, which would develop coherent rules to address the tax challenges arising from the digitalization of the economy.

Among its recommendations, USCIB emphasized that the OECD rules should be developed with consideration of their potential impact on global growth and business investment decisions, and should be designed in a way to support the achievement of tax certainty for taxpayers and tax administrations and not be too complex or too onerous in compliance to discourage global investment. According to its comments, USCIB noted that the rules should also be based, to the maximum extent possible, on internationally accepted principles of taxation for coherency in their creation and consistency in their application.

For USCIB’s complete comments to the OECD, please click here.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the International Organization of Employers, and Business at OECD (known as BIAC), USCIB helps to provide business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

USCIB Statement on USMCA Entry Into Force

Washington, D.C., July 1, 2020 – The U.S. Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents many of America’s leading global companies, welcomes today’s entry into force of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) trade agreement, preserving and deepening the economic ties in North America and bolstering the global competitiveness of our companies and workers. The implementation of this agreement comes at a critical time of restoring certainty to U.S. industry in the North American market, as the global market is working toward recovery from the impacts of the current crisis.

The three partner countries must continue to work together to ensure effective implementation of this agreement, so that the benefits of the agreement in its updated and modernized provisions including on digital trade and customs can be realized. Over 12 million American jobs depend on trade with Canada and Mexico, and continuing to build on this economic relationship is important for U.S. industry for future economic growth. USCIB looks forward to a seamless transition to the new agreement.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the International Organization of Employers, and Business at OECD (known as BIAC), USCIB helps to provide business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

USCIB Applauds Approval of OECD Principles on Artificial Intelligence

Washington, D.C., May 22, 2019 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), applauds the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) approval on May 22 of the OECD Principles on Artificial Intelligence (AI). Working through Business at OECD (BIAC), a core group of USCIB members participated in a special, 50+ member experts group that was convened to scope these principles. They contributed directly to the development of five complementary, values-based principles for the responsible development and stewardship of trustworthy AI and five recommendations for public policy and international cooperation.

Importantly, these principles are not prescriptive. They highlight human-centered values, fairness, transparency, robust security, and accountability as foundational elements for AI deployment that will ensure inclusive growth, sustainable development and well-being. The principles, which were developed through multistakeholder dialogue involving input from business, government, civil society, the technical community, and labor unions, also recognize the appropriate role of governments in creating an enabling environment for research and development to drive innovation in trustworthy AI. They call upon governments to develop mechanisms to share data and knowledge and programs to equip people with digital skills so they can transition to new employment that will harness AI for economic and societal good. The OECD’s 36 member countries, along with Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru and Romania, who signed up to the AI Principles at the organization’s annual Ministerial Council Meeting today in Paris, further agreed to cooperate across borders and sectors to share information, and develop international, interoperable standards to ensure safe, fair and trustworthy AI.

“USCIB is honored that its members played a direct role in shaping principles that will enable us to tap the extraordinary potential of Artificial Intelligence in a manner that will improve economic and societal well-being across diverse sectors such as energy and the environment, healthcare, and transportation, to name a few,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “Perhaps most important, these principles include important safeguards that keep human-centered values at the core of AI deployment and prevail upon all ‘AI actors’ to respect democratic values throughout the AI system lifecycle, commit to transparency, and to demonstrate accountability, among other responsibilities. We see a bright future ahead and look forward to the adoption of these principles by OECD members and non-members alike,” added Robinson.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043, jhuneke@uscib.org

Conference to Help Policymakers Navigate Fast-Evolving Digital Economy

Washington, D.C., February 26, 2019 – With the digital economy delivering innovations at breakneck speed, how can policymakers maximize the beneficial impacts of new technologies and business models, while also addressing challenges they may create? This is the fundamental question to be tackled at a March 25 conference in Washington, D.C.: “Going Digital: OECD Insights for a Changing World.”

The conference, a joint program of the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), Business at OECD (BIAC) and the 36-nation Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), will bring together an array of experts from business, government, the technical community and civil society.

“Since the OECD launched its Going Digital project two years ago, it has sought to help policymakers foster an environment that enables national economies and societies to prosper in a world that is increasingly digital and data-driven,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson. “This conference will provide a first readout of discussions at the OECD’s pivotal Going Digital Summit, which takes place March 11-12 in Paris, while also serving as a platform for discussion of developments in the digital economy from an American perspective.”

Topics for discussion include:

  • Making the Digital Transformation Work for Growth and Well-Being
  • The OECD’s “Going Digital” Policy Recommendations: From Paper to Practice
  • Securing the Digital Economy rom Cyber-Threats
  • Harnessing Artificial Intelligence for Economic and Social Prosperity

Confirmed speakers for the conference include:

  • Andrew Wyckoff, director of the OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation
  • Robert Strayer, deputy assistant secretary for cyber and international communications and information policy, U.S. Department of State
  • David Redl, administrator of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), U.S. Department of Commerce
  • Gail Slater, special assistant to the president for technology, telecommunications and cybersecurity policy, National Economic Council, The White House
  • Lynne Parker, assistant director for artificial intelligence, Office of Science and Technology, The White House

Held at the AT&T Forum for Technology, Entertainment and Policy, this event is the latest in the Joseph H. Alhadeff Digital Economy Conference Series, named in honor of the late Oracle Corp. executive who provided crucial business leadership on digital economy topics at the OECD and in many other forums.

More information is available on the conference website.

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, including BIAC, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:

Jonathan Huneke, USCIB

jhuneke@uscib.org, +1 212.703.5043

 

Ellen Blackler of Disney Named to Chair USCIB’s ICT Policy Committee

Ellen Blackler, The Walt Disney Company

New York, N.Y., August 20, 2018 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents American business in numerous global policy forums, has appointed Ellen Blackler, vice president of global public policy with The Walt Disney Company, as chair of its Information, Communications and Technology (ICT) Committee. As chair, Blackler will spearhead the organization’s development and delivery of business views on information technology and internet policy matters worldwide, working with companies and organizations from across USCIB’s diverse membership.

“Ellen Blackler brings in-depth knowledge of critical issues in international ICT policy and cross-border business,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson. “She has played a key role in forging consensus across industries to advance business views in the UN, the OECD and other important multilateral forums. Under Ellen’s stewardship of our ICT Committee, and with the ongoing support of USCIB Vice President Barbara Wanner, we look forward to fostering an even more active and constructive role for the private sector in global ICT policy discussions.”

Blackler manages public policy issues for Disney on a range of issues related to internet policy, human rights, privacy, and children and the media. Prior to joining Disney, Blackler worked for AT&T, where she oversaw policy development on privacy, broadband deployment and universal service, access to ICT for people with disabilities, health care and tax-related issues. Blackler previously served on the staff of the Federal Communications Commission, where she led the team drafting the FCC’s annual reports on the availability of broadband service, among other responsibilities, and in the New York State government.

USCIB’s ICT Committee advocates for policies characterized by free and fair competition, minimal government intervention and free information flows that ensure the continued growth of information and communication technologies in a range of strategic forums, including the UN, OECD, APEC and ICANN. In particular, it leverages USCIB’s overseas network of business groups, including the International Chamber of Commerce and Business at OECD, to secure strong industry representation and input to major multilateral discussions of ICT issues.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP Communications, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

Washington Conference to Explore OECD’s Role in Facilitating the Digital Transformation

ict_conference_boxNew York, N.Y., January 18, 2017 – How can policy makers and the business community work together to ensure that new technologies and digital applications can lead to a more prosperous, productive, inclusive and socially beneficial world? And what lessons can be learned from recent discussions and related work within the 35-nation Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)?

This is the focus of a timely conference, “Fostering Digital Transformation: The OECD’s Role,” organized by The USCIB Foundation, the educational arm of the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), March 8 in Washington, D.C.

“This will be an important forum for dialogue among technologists and policy makers to help us navigate toward a more robust, secure and inclusive digital economy,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson. “Following last year’s pivotal OECD Ministerial in Cancun, which recognized the digital economy as a powerful catalyst for innovation, growth and overall prosperity, the focus will be on moving forward the OECD’s ambitious agenda. We will explore how broad-ranging OECD policy frameworks can help to address new challenges posed by changing global policy dynamics.”

Topics for discussion include:

  • The Digital Economy and Information Society of the Future
  • Realizing the Global Commercial Benefits and Corporate Societal Responsibilities of Digitalization
  • Enhancing Trust in the Digitally Connected Ecosystem

Confirmed speakers for the event include:

  • Douglas Frantz, deputy secretary general of the OECD
  • Andrew Wyckoff, director of the OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation
  • Anne Carblanc, head of the OECD Digital Economy Policy Division
  • Eric Loeb, senior vice president of international external and regulatory affairs, AT&T
  • Joseph Alhadeff, vice president of global public policy, Oracle Corp.

The conference, which is co-organized by the OECD and Business at OECD (BIAC), will take place at the Microsoft Innovation & Policy Center (901 K Street, NW, Washington, D.C.). More information is available on the conference website. Event sponsors and partners include AT&T, Google, Microsoft and Inside Cybersecurity.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence.  Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world.  With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, including BIAC, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043, click here to e-mail

Business Urges U.S. Government to Push Back Against Efforts to Expand ITU’s Jurisdiction

Womans controls Internet of Things in smart home with appNew York, N.Y., September 27, 2016 – Representing a broad cross-section of the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, the United States Council for International Business (USCIB) released a statement today outlining business priorities for the upcoming World Telecommunication Standardization Assembly 2016 (WTSA-16). The meeting will convene from October 25 to November 3 in Tunisia to determine the work program of the United Nations’ International Telecommunication Union Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T), which develops international recommendations for the telecommunication sector.

While USCIB appreciates the ITU’s role in developing international standards that promote the smooth functioning of global telecommunication networks, the business group opposes expanding the ITU’s remit to include Internet governance policy.

“We urge the U.S. government to push back strongly on efforts by some member states to use the WTSA-16 review of the ITU-T’s work program as an opportunity to expand the ITU’s jurisdiction to include various Internet governance issues,” USCIB said in the statement. “A multi-stakeholder framework has proved far more effective in addressing Internet policy matters against a dynamic technological backdrop than binding rules developed by an inter-governmental organization.”

The business community also expressed concern about proposals to expand the role of governments in fostering the Internet of Things (IoT), citing the danger that such an expansion of the ITU’s remit would “support government mandates that will stifle rather than promote the benefits of IoT.” USCIB stressed that there should be no mandates or regulation of emerging technologies.

USCIB supports the efforts of the U.S. government and other sector members at the WTSA-16 to underscore the value of the ITU in “developing important technical and voluntary telecommunications standards,” the statement added.

“Expanding its work program beyond its current remit would compromise the Sector’s ability to meet its current goals,” the statement concludes. “Moreover, such an expansion would negatively impact industry’s ability to address Internet governance-related issues and explore standards and best practices for emerging technologies that are more effectively addressed in existing multi-stakeholder policy-making and standards-setting bodies.”

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP communications, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

USCIB Supports EU Endorsement of the Privacy Shield Framework

Digital GlobeWashington, D.C., July 11, 2016 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB) strongly supports the July 8 vote to approve the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield by the Article 31 Committee, a group composed of representatives from each of the European Union’s 28 Member States. The Privacy Shield framework will serve as a new mechanism governing the transatlantic transfer of data to replace the previous “Safe Harbor” arrangement, which the European Court of Justice invalidated in October 2015. EU Justice Commissioner Vera Jourova is expected to sign it officially in the near future.

“The favorable vote by the Article 31 Committee on July 8 is a credit to the tireless and concerted efforts of negotiators from the European Union and the United States to realize a new, stronger privacy protection mechanism governing transatlantic data flows,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “The new framework will provide greater certainty for business and confidence for consumers, which, in turn, will promote business activities and investments yielding increased economic and societal benefits for all. USCIB encourages both governments to implement the new Privacy Shield in a timely manner.”

The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) also issued a statement welcoming the EU’s endorsement of the privacy shield, saying the endorsement is an important step for the transatlantic economy.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP Communications, USCIB
+1 212.7035043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network – encompassing ICC, the International Organization of Employers, and the Business and Industry Advisory Committee to the OECD – USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. www.uscib.org.