USCIB Statement to US Government on Remote Worker Relief

USCIB has joined with over a dozen other associations to issue a statement on July 2 to urge the federal government to allow an employee’s wages to be treated as being earned at their normal work location and to have Congress protect health care and other workers travelling across state lines to help with the COVID-19 response. The full statement:

“The dual challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic and an economic crisis have created significant disruption and uncertainty for American workers. To lighten the burden on individuals and families, the undersigned associations strongly urge that you support legislation addressing state and local tax confusion arising for employees required to work remotely because of COVID-19.

“Providing this certainty at an otherwise uncertain time is essential. Without Congressional action, employees may receive unexpected and unwelcomed tax surprises when they file their 2020 state and local income tax returns next year – and face penalties and interest charges (and even potential double taxation) through no fault of their own. A federal solution is needed because the states are taking different and conflicting positions on how the income of workers displaced by the pandemic should be taxed. Solving this problem will ensure employees who are working remotely during the pandemic are not penalized for doing so.

“Currently, wages earned by an employee generally are subject to tax by the state where they work. However, due to COVID-19, many workers are unable to report to their normal work location and are working in a different state than usual due to local law restrictions, closed schools, family health or other reasons, complicating their state tax reporting obligations.

“The solution to this problem is simple: enact federal legislation that reduces uncertainty by allowing an employee’s wages to be treated as being earned at their normal work location. Congress should also protect health care and other workers traveling across state lines to help with the COVID-19 response from surprise or higher tax bills. The Remote and Mobile Worker Relief Act of 2020, S. 3995, recently introduced by Senators John Thune (R-SD) and Sherrod Brown (D-OH), would accomplish these goals. These solutions will maintain the status quo by putting wage earners and their employers in the same tax position they would have been in, but for the pandemic, while providing important certainty to workers who temporarily relocate to provide critical assistance during this pandemic.

“We urge the inclusion of these changes in the next COVID-19 legislation.”

USCIB Statement on USMCA Entry Into Force

Washington, D.C., July 1, 2020 – The U.S. Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents many of America’s leading global companies, welcomes today’s entry into force of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) trade agreement, preserving and deepening the economic ties in North America and bolstering the global competitiveness of our companies and workers. The implementation of this agreement comes at a critical time of restoring certainty to U.S. industry in the North American market, as the global market is working toward recovery from the impacts of the current crisis.

The three partner countries must continue to work together to ensure effective implementation of this agreement, so that the benefits of the agreement in its updated and modernized provisions including on digital trade and customs can be realized. Over 12 million American jobs depend on trade with Canada and Mexico, and continuing to build on this economic relationship is important for U.S. industry for future economic growth. USCIB looks forward to a seamless transition to the new agreement.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the International Organization of Employers, and Business at OECD (known as BIAC), USCIB helps to provide business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

USCIB Statement on Workplace Equality for All

June 30, 2020, New York, New York — As Pride Month 2020 draws to a close, USCIB joins in applauding the landmark decision issued by the U.S. Supreme Court this month affirming that discrimination in the workplace against employees based on their gender identify or sexual orientation is not permissible under U.S. federal law. Discrimination – regardless of the form – has no place in our society or our workplaces. Through our role as the U.S. Employer representative at the International Labor Organization, USCIB has been a recognized champion of fundamental principles and rights at work, including non-discrimination in the workplace regardless of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation or national origin. This month’s decision reaffirms the rights and dignity of LGBT people and brings our nation one step closer towards the promise of equality for all.

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the International Organization of Employers, and Business at OECD (BIAC), USCIB helps to provide business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Kira Yevtukhova, USCIB
+1 202.617.3160, kyevtukhova@uscib.org

 

USCIB Announces Leadership Change in Customs, Trade Facilitation Work

Jerry Cook (left) alongside Former Acting United States Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan and USCIB President & CEO Peter Robinson

USCIB has announced that Vice President for Government Relations at Hanesbrands Jerry Cook is stepping down from the chairmanship of USCIB’s Customs and Trade Facilitation Committee as of July 1.

For over ten years, Cook has led the multi-sectoral Committee in strengthening USCIB’s content practice in customs and trade facilitation field and helped position the organization with the U.S. Departments of Homeland Security (including Customs and Border Protection), Treasury, and Commerce, as well as the United States Trade Representative, the International Chamber of Commerce and the World Customs Organization, among others.

After over ten years of chairmanship, Cook noted that it is time for a change.

“While serving as Chair, I have witnessed much growth in this practice and am truly proud of the progress and accomplishments the membership has jointly achieved,” said Cook. “I appreciate the opportunity to have worked with all for achieving many consensus positions and efforts and being a part of such a strong and dedicated team. I will continue to look forward to seeing the continued success of USCIB, and the work I have been proud to lead.”

USCIB expresses its gratitude to Cook for his service and will announce successor leadership in the near future.

Virtual ICANN Focuses on COVID-Related Domain Name System Abuse

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) held its second meeting of the year June 22-25. Due to COVID-19-related safety concerns the meeting, originally planned to take place in Malaysia, was again held virtually. USCIB Vice President for ICT Policy Barbara Wanner joined the meeting remotely, along with several USCIB members as part of ICANN’s Business Constituency (BC).

As ICANN President and CEO Goran Marby noted, the ability of the ICANN community to adapt to this challenging time represents a “testament to our shared goal of [working to ensure] the continued security, stability and resilience of the DNS [Domain Name System].” Marby also noted that protecting against DNS abuse never has been more critical since “bad actors” have exploited the pandemic.

According to Wanner, the spike in COVID-related DNS abuse was a hot topic at ICANN 68. USCIB reiterated acute concerns expressed at ICANN 66 and ICANN 67 about inaction by ICANN Org and the contracted parties in mitigating domain name system (DNS) abuse that continues to escalate by the day. The BC asserted there should be an agreed approach to implementing tools to combat such abuse that is institutionalized as a process and memorialized in contracts between ICANN and the registries and the registry/registrar agreements.

“ICANN Org continued to insist while it expects registry operators to enforce their agreements with registrars prohibiting DNS abuse, there continues to be a lack of clarity about what constitutes DNS abuse which complicates contractual enforcement,” said Wanner. “The contracted parties, in turn, underscored their commitment to combatting abuse and highlighted voluntary efforts to develop a Guide to Abuse Reporting Best Practices. By the meeting’s conclusion, there was no clear path forward, although several approaches were proposed.”

USCIB Joins With Global Community to Oppose Revision to ISO 26000

USCIB joined with several other U.S. business associations in opposing a recent proposal to revise ISO 26000 on Social Responsibility, develop implementation guidelines or standards and create a new Technical Committee (TC) on Social Responsibility.  After a five-year global negotiation, ISO 26000 was released in November of 2010 as a guidance document rather than a management systems for certification purposes and it remains a valuable resource for companies.

USCIB Vice President for Corporate Responsibility and Labor Affairs Gabriella Rigg Herzog observed that the proposal currently before ISO would, “not only reverse the consensus achieved over the five year negotiation, but would also divert resources and away from ongoing implementation and innovation in the field of social responsibility.”

Global stakeholders who also opposed this proposal included leading human rights NGOs, the International Trade Union Confederation, the International Organization of Employers (IOE), and the International Labor Organization (ILO). Moreover, and as was expressed by ILO Secretary-General Guy Ryder, adoption of this proposal would divert focus from and undermine universally accepted standards on human rights and labor issues, including the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, ILO Conventions, the ILO Tripartite Declaration of Principles concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy, and the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises.

USCIB continues to follow this matter and will be in communication with members and our global affiliates as this matter develops.

USCIB Statement on OECD’s Inclusive Framework

USCIB has issued the following statement on June 23 with regards to the OECD Inclusive Framework process:

USCIB remains committed to proactive participation in the current OECD Inclusive Framework process to achieve consensus on acceptable modifications to the international tax system to properly address the tax challenges of the digitalization of the economy.

USCIB and its member companies will continue to work diligently towards a sustainable agreement and will encourage the U.S. government to remain committed to this process.

Robinson Featured in ILO’s “First Person: COVID-19 Stories” Series

USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson

The International Labor Organization (ILO) launched a series of “First person: COVID-19 stories from the world of work,” collecting stories from around the globe and giving a voice to government officials, business owners and essential workers, those working from home and those who have lost their jobs, young people just entering the world of work and retirees-turned-volunteers.

Recently, USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson gave an interview of how the pandemic has affected USCIB, how it is responding, lessons learned from the experience and how we will all be “confronting a new reality” rather than a “return to normal.”

“One major lesson of this pandemic is a reaffirmation that we are all global citizens and we are fighting against an enemy that knows no border, so we must ensure that we join hands across borders and work together in a multilateral way on an economic recovery that is inclusive,” said Robinson.

Robinson also discussed USCIB’s approaches in ensuring the safety of its employees, objectives to support USCIB’s international network (such as that of the International Organization of Employers), and engaging in global work in more vulnerable economies where livelihoods are being upended and where Small and Medium Enterprises deserve special attention.

To view Robinson’s video, click here.

To view the collection of stories compiled by the ILO, please visit here.

Kennedy Speaks on Border Carbon Adjustments, Carbon Pricing

While the UNFCCC postponed its 26th Conference of the Parties to next year, USCIB has remained active in its policy advocacy on international climate change. Most recently, USCIB Vice President for Strategic International Engagement, Environment and Energy Norine Kennedy spoke in a virtual “USA-EU Town Hall on Border Carbon Adjustments.”

The June 17 event was organized by the European Roundtable on Climate Change and Sustainable Transition (ERCST) and the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions at Duke University.

“Border Carbon Adjustment cannot be viewed in isolation; it is connected to carbon pricing, taxation and carbon offsets, that need to be taken into consideration when discussing this topic,” said Kennedy during her remarks.

The town hall discussion focused on the role that Border Carbon Adjustments (BCAs) may play as part of the EU Green Deal proposal and associated stimulus package.  This concept aims to tackle asymmetry in climate ambition under the Paris Agreement, from carbon leakage and competitiveness standpoints.

“We need to develop and design policies that are fit for purpose and work in synergy with multilateral trade in order to successfully overcome climate challenges and fulfil the Paris Agreement goals,” added Kennedy.

USCIB strongly favors multilateral cooperative approaches and policies not only in the climate space, but also via the United Nations and other international organizations.

USCIB, Global Industry Urge WTO to Resume Full Work

As international organizations such as the UN Security Council, International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank are routinely working online, the World Trade Organization (WTO) has yet to fully empower its substantive bodies to meet and take decisions virtually. In light of this, USCIB, along with major industry associations across the world, issued a statement on June 15 urging WTO Members to restart a full, regular schedule of work online. The statement emphasized that the international business community needs the WTO fully engaged across its existing work program, as well as to address the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic aftermath.

The statement noted: “Trade law and policy has an important, indeed integral, role to play in recovery. The replacement of the departing Director-General Roberto Azevêdo makes a return to regular working using virtual tools even more important…We cannot return to where we were, we must move forward, and this will require a whole of society approach at the local, national, and international level.”

The industry groups also reiterated commitment to the WTO and the international rules-based trade architecture for which it is responsible.

For the full statement, click here.