Donnelly Talks Biden Administration Trade Policy With Canada’s AmCham Pacific 

USCIB Senior Advisor Shaun Donnelly was the guest speaker on a webinar titled, “Biden Trade Policy: What’s Ahead?” hosted by the Vancouver-based Pacific Chapter of the American Chamber of Commerce (AmCham) Canada. Donnelly, a former USTR trade negotiator and retired U.S. Ambassador, offered his candid assessments of the economic and political factors shaping President Joe Biden’s trade policy, with a special focus on Canada, the US-Mexico-Canada (“USMCA”) agreement, China, and the World Trade Organization (WTO).

Questions from webinar participants focused on concerns about a turn toward protectionism in the U.S., especially on government procurement in light of strong statements from the President and other Administration officials endorsing “Buy American.”

According to Donnelly, it was a “return gig” for him; in 2018, he had traveled to Vancouver as the dinner speaker at the AmCham’s annual dinner.

“It’s always good to get beyond our Washington trade policy wonk cocoon and speak with, and listen to, real business people, whether here at home in the U.S. or in key trade partners like Canada,” said Donnelly.  “Canada is obviously a unique trade partner with our integrated North American marketplace. I told the webinar participants that I am confident that the Biden Administration would be an engaged partner with Canada on USMCA implementation issues, as well as on shared global priorities like WTO reform and confronting China’s abusive trade practices as well as, of course, the full range of bilateral issues. It was a very good session. And no jet lag!”

Educate to Vaccinate Event Promotes COVID-19 Global Workplace Challenge

Anuradha Gupta of Gavi

Following the launch of The USCIB Foundation’s Business Partners to CONVINCE (BP2C) initiative and the initiative’s COVID-19 Global Workplace Challenge, the group held its first major event “Educate to Vaccinate: The Role of Employers” on April 29. The event brought together global public health and business experts, small and medium companies from around the globe, international employer organizations, and other stakeholders, to discuss actionable workplace strategies for vaccine adoption and the vital role employers can play in educating their employees on the facts about COVID-19 vaccines and motivating – not mandating – the workforce to get vaccinated.

“What better example of the transformative power of science, policy, business and society working together than the response to the pandemic,” said USCIB Executive Vice President Abby Shapiro, who leads BP2C. “Working with three of the world’s largest business networks including the ICC, IOE and Business at OECD to mobilize their business networks, BP2C will reach millions of workers with information and tools to combat misinformation and inspire confidence in vaccination. Keeping employees safe is not only the right thing to do, but also the way forward to a healthy, vaccine-literate workforce.”

Notable speakers at the “Educate to Vaccinate” event included GAVI Deputy Chief Executive Anuradha Gupta, Meredith Flynn-Ripley (Salesforce), Dr. Vicki Weldon (ExxonMobil), Julia Spencer (MSD), as well as public health experts: Larry Gostin (Georgetown University), Heidi Larson (The Vaccine Confidence Project and the CONVINCE initiative), Dr. Scott Ratzan (CUNY School of Public Health and BP2C), and Nancy Lee (Global Health and CONVINCE). Senior international business network representatives included Ali Karami-Ruiz from Business at OECD, Roberto Suárez Santos of the International Organization of Employers (IOE), and Andrew Wilson from the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC).

Participants also heard from companies and organizations across the globe that have already signed up to take the Workplace Challenge including Randstad North America, the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the American Staffing Association, and dozens of other companies and organizations around the globe.

“We encourage everyone to take the Workplace Challenge and, by doing so, showcase their commitment to educating their employees,” added Shapiro.

What are you waiting for? Sign up now for The Workplace Challenge!

Business Partners to CONVINCE (BP2C) is the private sector arm of the global, multisector CONVINCE (COVID-19 New Vaccine Information, Communication, and Engagement) initiative that advances vaccine literacy and promotes vaccine acceptance.

Donnelly, Hampl Help Lead Business Input on OECD China Work

USCIB Senior Advisor Shaun Donnelly and member company Dell staffer Eva Hampl led a significant “kick-off” session for Business at OECD (BIAC) and its China Experts Group to elevate and deepen a dialogue with the OECD’s Ambassadorial-level Informal Reflection Group on China on May 3.

The BIAC China team presented concerns and recommendations on four China-related items: state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and government support; inward and outward foreign direct investment (FDI) policies; innovation and digitalization policies; and a “climate neutrality” agenda. Other key topics will be addressed in future OECD and BIAC China discussions. Over 100 participants were on session, including OECD country Ambassadors and senior delegates, OECD staff, and BIAC participants, including USCIB members.

Representing BIAC, Donnelly led on FDI issues, focusing on both sides of the China investment coin – foreign investment into China and Chinese investment in our home countries and in third country markets.  With regards to investing in China, Donnelly highlighted business concerns over lack of a level-playing field, formal and informal discrimination against foreign investors, and a lack of effective rule of law in China. On the side of Chinese FDI in our countries, he highlighted two priority concerns, including establishing strong, targeted, and enforceable national security rules on foreign investors while avoiding investment protectionism. Donnelly also noted potential problems in competing against Chinese companies , often state-owned enterprises, which have invested in our markets can be heavily subsidized back home. Donnelly’s comments sparked a good discussion on the substantive issues and on priorities for OECD Investment Committee work going forward.

Hampl, a former USCIB policy director now with Dell’s Washington office, is Vice Chair of the BIAC China Experts group. Hampl was one of three BIAC presenters on innovation and digitalization issues, highlighting that supply chain resiliency, especially in the semiconductor sector, is at the top of global concerns with China and praising the OECD for its ability to decouple economics from politics on such vital issues. Hampl also noted the importance of engaging China constructively on a range of issues related to standards, privacy, intellectual property protections, as well as the broader issues of leveling the playing field and competition against Chinese SOEs.

According to Donnelly, other BIAC colleagues made assertive presentations on the unique challenges of competing with Chinese SOEs, especially in China, but also in the U.S. and around the world.  Several participants urged that disciplines on SOEs be added to the World Trade Organization (WTO) agenda and included in bilateral trade and investment agreements.  Finally, the climate neutrality agenda item provoked broad agreement that the OECD must play a leading role in the broader effort to enlist China constructively in the global climate effort; while much remains to be done, participants agreed that engaging China on climate should be somewhat easier now that the U.S. has rejoined the Paris Climate Accord.

BIAC Executive Secretary Hanni Rosenbaum, who led BIAC in this novel, in-depth BIAC/OECD session on China, was delighted with participation and the quality of debate. Rosenbaum sees potential for deepening and expanding the BIAC/OECD dialogue on China with new leadership coming to the OECD and a growing consensus among OECD member countries that China poses unique challenges.

“I thought it was an excellent session,” said Donnelly. “The discussion was substantive, candid and forward-looking. The four agenda items are crucial, but there are plenty of other important China-related issues where BIAC can make useful contributions to OECD’s work. These high-level, cross-cutting China discussions, hopefully to be held regularly, can complement in-depth work in specific OECD committees. There is a lot of challenging work with China and the OECD can play a valuable role in this effort.”

Alice Slayton Clark, USCIB’s new director for investment, trade and China will be leading USCIB’s work on China, both specific to the OECD and more generally, going forward. If you have issues, questions, or suggestions related to China, please get in touch with Clark.

USCIB Makes Interventions on Tech Policy Topics at OECD Digital Economy Meetings

The OECD Committee on Digital Economy Policy (CDEP) and its Working Parties held virtual meetings March 24 – April 15. Under the auspices of Business at OECD (BIAC), USCIB members provided substantive interventions on topics already in the tech policy spotlight, as well as addressed issues likely to rise in importance as the digital economy continues to evolve.

According to USCIB Vice President for ICT Policy Barbara Wanner, USCIB/BIAC members provided important commentary aimed at shaping the work of a special governments-only drafting group, which has been focused on developing high-level guidance on government access to personal data held by the private sector.

“BIAC’s written statement highlighted that concerns of personal data losing protections when accessed by governments across borders have encouraged policy responses that can negatively impact economic activity,” said Wanner.

“[Such policies] threaten to slow down economic growth as we try to recover from the pandemic,” added Norman Barbosa of Microsoft, who intervened on behalf of BIAC.

In addition, members joined the U.S. government and others in urging a pause in the OECD’s efforts to develop a Voluntary Transparency Reporting Framework (VTRF) to facilitate more effective detection and mitigation of Terrorist and Violent Extremist Content (TVEC) online to build a robust evidence base on both the uptake and functionality of the baseline framework. USCIB members further distinguished the business community by developing practical guidance and shared procedural approaches to guide policymakers in implementing trustworthy Artificial Intelligence (AI) that embody the five values-based OECD AI Principles.

USCIB Leads in Preparations for Upcoming China Meetings at OECD

USCIB members and staff played leading roles in the April 23 China Expert Group’s preliminary meeting to preview and discuss Business at OECD (BIAC) presentations that will be made at the kick-off session of the OECD’s Informal Reflection Group on China in May. During the preliminary meeting, BIAC experts, including USCIB Senior Advisor Shaun Donnelly and Dell’s Eva Hampl (formerly USCIB and now a Vice Chair of BIAC’s China group), advanced key points that BIAC will emphasize including on state-owned enterprises (SOEs), investment, innovation and digitalization, and climate neutrality.

With regards to SOEs, Donnelly and others emphasized the importance of including provisions on SOEs in future investment and trade agreements, updating World Trade Organization (WTO) rules on subsidies, drawing China into multilateral consensus on export and development finance, as well as engaging China to reduce excess capacity in steel and rejoin the Global Forum on Steel Excess Capacity. The investment dialogue between China and the OECD should also be intensified and made more substantive, rather than political, according to Donnelly. Updating the investment policy review of China is also critical since the last review was done in 2008.

On innovation and digitalization, Donnelly noted the need to review efforts to onshore production in the name of supply chain resiliency, to study global value chains to ensure that policies are driven by OECD-generated facts and not politics and protectionism, to foster cooperation on IT and Artificial Intelligence (AI) information-sharing and standards’ development, engaging China on implementation and dissemination of AI principles and policies, as well as monitoring and acting on China’s development of virtual currency along with its impact on major currencies.

“Engaging China on harmonizing carbon pricing and emission trading schemes, pushing China more toward sustainable investment policies at home and abroad (such as their Belt and Road projects use of fossil fuels) and continuing to press for mitigation and strong environmental commitments from China is key,” said Donnelly.

Donnelly also led a discussion urging BIAC, as a business forum, to press the OECD and its member governments for substantive reform and results in its engagement with China and to worry less about protocol and diplomatic formalities.

“It was great to have USCIB and American business actively involved in BIAC’s preparations for this important China strategy session at the OECD,” added Donnelly.  “With a new Secretary General coming to OECD in June, a new U.S. Administration looking to play a leadership role at the OECD, and steadily growing concerns around the world about some of China’s policies and practices, it’s vital that Business at OECD and its American members focus on these issues of how the OECD can play a useful role with China.”

Donnelly added: “Eva Hampl from Dell did a great job leading Friday’s discussion on the innovation and digitalization issues.  She and I look forward to our roles as BIAC lead speakers in the session with the OECD China group.  It was also great to see several USCIB members logging on for the BIAC discussion, confirming that China issues, broadly defined, remain important priorities for USCIB and its broad, cross-sectoral membership.”

If members have issues, questions or suggestions related to this BIAC and OECD effort on China, please contact Allice Slayton Clark (asclark@uscib.org).

USCIB Hosts Dialogue on Business Role in Sustainable Recovery and Paris Climate Pledges

Jesse Young (USG) and Norine Kennedy (USCIB)

Ahead of the White House Leaders’ Climate Summit, the Major Economies Forum and the Biden Administration’s unveiling of its Paris Agreement pledge and implementation plan, also known as the U.S. Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC), the Major Economies Business Forum (BizMEF) hosted a virtual Business Dialogue on April 21 on “Synergies with Sustainable Recovery: The Role of Business in Strengthening NDCs,” moderated by USCIB Senior Vice President Norine Kennedy.

Opening the meeting was USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson, who reflected on the crucial nature of inclusive multilateralism and the thought-leadership contributions USCIB has made in international climate change policy over the past two decades.

Peter Robinson makes remarks at BizMEF event

“An inclusive U.S. NDC will also be an ambitious and resilient one,” said Robinson. “During U.S. Climate Week, we can inspire and learn from one another. COP after COP since 1993, USCIB has worked supportively with U.S. administrations to make real progress for private sector innovation, investment and action in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC). We’ll also be working with the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the International Organization of Employers (IOE), and Business at OECD (BIAC) to encourage governments around the world to strengthen their NDCs.”

During the meeting, government, and industry speakers from Japan, Denmark, Kenya and India discussed linking recovery and climate action through inclusive, ambitious NDCs, engaging business at national and global levels.

Jesse Young, senior advisor to the Special Presidential Envoy on Climate John Kerry, concluded the meeting with what can be expected during the White House Leaders’ Climate Summit; in addition to a new U.S. NDC, the Administration will release the first-ever international climate finance plan which will include a blueprint for how all U.S. government agencies will be enhancing action on climate change, as well as clear targets on climate finance, keeping in mind the role of business. He also commended BizMEF for continuing to advance constructive recommendations on international climate policy, when Major Economies Forum meetings were discontinued.

About: This virtual Business Dialogue built on BizMEF Dialogues at COPs in Doha, Warsaw, Lima, Bonn, Katowice and Madrid in 2019, followed by a first Virtual Business Dialogue in December last year. The Major Economies Business Forum on Energy Security and Climate Change (BizMEF) is a partnership of major multi-sectoral business organizations from major economies in developed and developing countries, and includes BusinessEurope, CII, CEOE, Business Unity South Africa, CGEM, MEDEF, BDI, Keidanren, and CNI. Since its launch in 2009,  BizMEF has provided responsible business views and practical input to the international climate change discussions at UNFCCC and OECD. USCIB is a founding partner of BizMEF, and helps support the alliance’s activities.

USCIB Welcomes New Director for Investment, Trade and China

Alice Slayton Clark

USCIB welcomed Alice Slayton Clark this week as Director for Investment, Trade and China policy. Clark brings with her considerable experience in trade policy, having worked in a number of international law firms and consulting practices, as well as on Capitol Hill.

Most recently, Clark has been a Senior Government Relations Advisor for Jacobs Global Trade & Compliance LLC. Prior to this she spent time as an independent International Trade Consultant, and as an International Trade Specialist at Sidley Austin Brown & Wood, Powell Goldstein Frazer & Murphy, Graham & James, and Mudge Rose Guthrie Alexander and Ferdon. She began her trade career in the offices of Representative Robert Torricelli and Senator Bob Graham.

Alice received a BA in Government and Spanish from Oberlin College, and an MA in International Relations From Tufts University’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. In the past she has served as the President of the Women in International Trade (WIIT) group, and as a leader in local and school organizations.

Alice can be reached at asclark@uscib.org.

USCIB Defends Foreign Direct Investment at OECD

USCIB has led private sector participation at a series of recent events organized by the OECD’s Investment Committee.  Kimberley Claman, director of international government affairs in Citi’s Washington office, was a lead speaker for the Business at OECD (BIAC) delegation in a condensed, virtual OECD annual International Investment Agreements Conference on March 29.

During a portion of the conference, titled “The Future of International Investment Agreements” on March 29, Claman laid out a coherent business vision on the importance of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) flows, especially in a post-pandemic world, and of strong investment agreements to help provide the certainty, assurance and enforceability required by investors. “Typical of these OECD sessions, other speakers were skeptical of FDI and, especially of investment treaties, so having a strong business voice is critical,” said USCIB Senior Advisor Shaun Donnelly. “Kimberley did a great job.”

Donnelly returned to the OECD investment policy debates on March 31 as a lead speaker for BIAC in an early-morning, virtual seminar at the fifth session of the OECD’s long-running “FDI Qualities” policy dialogue. OECD staff laid out its latest research and analysis on FDI’s impact to an audience that included a diverse group of academics, NGOs and business representatives. The presentation focused on four areas selected from the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)– gender inclusivity, quality jobs and productivity enhancement, low carbon intensity, and promoting small and medium enterprises (SMEs).  Donnelly was the lead business commentator on the jobs and productivity session and spoke in the gender discussion, bringing a real-world, business perspective to the oftentimes academic nature of OECD seminars.

Donnelly was also back on the agenda as part of the BIAC Investment Committee leadership in the formal “stakeholder dialogue” with government representatives on the OECD Investment Committee at their April 8 wrap-up session following a week of OECD meetings.  This “stakeholder” session gave BIAC an opportunity to underline directly to the OECD committee its business perspectives and priorities on investment policy in a post-pandemic period.

“We see these OECD sessions on FDI policies, especially policies related to international investment agreements as important opportunities to present a business perspective on why FDI is so important to global economic growth, integration, trade and jobs,” said Donnelly, who is a retired U.S. Ambassador and trade negotiator.

Donnelly added: “Frankly, FDI, investment treaties and global economic integration are under unfair political attacks here at home and around the world.  We as business need to tell our story—how international investment flows, both inward and outward, are good for the American economy.  We welcome these opportunities to talk investment issues, not just with like-minded business groups but also with broader mix of participants that we find at OECD, UNCTAD and other UN sessions.  We are particularly grateful to Kimberley Claman from USCIB member company Citi for making time to take on a major speaking role. She did a fantastic job presenting how businesses in the real world approach investment decisions, and how those decisions are good for our economy.”

USCIB Provides Input to OECD Task Force on Countering Illicit Trade

Through Business at OECD (BIAC), USCIB recently had an opportunity to contribute to an OECD Task Force on Countering Illicit Trade Plenary Meeting. During the Plenary, the Chair of BIAC’s Anti-Illicit Trade Expert Group and Chair of USCIB’s Customs and Trade Facilitation Committee, David Luna, highlighted the significant impact of illicit trade on the economy, businesses and people’s welfare. Luna also stressed the importance of collaboration among all stakeholders, including public and private, to counter the significant risks posed by illicit trade.

Luna used this platform to officially announce the launch of a new partnership program with the OECD, which seeks to strengthen public-private sector collaboration on tackling illicit trade. The partnership will commence with a special project focused on “the challenges of illicit trade for e-commerce” and will soon be followed by another project on “illicit trade in high-risk areas at the time of Covid-19.”

The partnership is also looking into launching two additional potential projects on Maritime Transports and Free Trade Zones.

USCIB Joins COVID-19 Global Workplace Challenge

In advance of World Immunization Week later this month, USCIB has announced on April 6 that it has taken the “COVID-19 Global Workplace Challenge”—a commitment by companies to listen to employees’ needs and concerns about COVID-19 and encourage vaccine confidence and uptake.

The “Workplace Challenge” was launched this spring by Business Partners to CONVINCE, a multi-sector effort to empower a “vaccine-literate” public, based on trust in science and aligned commitment to future COVID-19 vaccines and other novel countermeasures.

“Business can play a pivotal role in addressing vaccine hesitancy with its extensive reach and the high level of trust imbued in employers by their employees,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “I encourage other companies and organizations around the globe to join the Workplace Challenge and, by doing so, showcase their commitment to make their workplaces safer and provide up-to-date information from health professionals to follow the science.

By joining the Workplace Challenge, USCIB agrees to:

  • Listen to employees’ needs and concerns about the impact and prevention of COVID-19
  • Follow the latest public health guidance to protect myself, my employees, my workplace, my customers, and my community from COVID-19
  • Promote vaccine literacy based on the latest scientific evidence of vaccination benefits and risks
  • Encourage vaccine confidence and uptake
  • Advocate for accessible, equitable, and timely vaccination of employees
  • Engage with communities, schools, faith-based organizations and public health leaders to stop the spread of COVID-19

For more information on Business Partners to CONVINCE or to join the Workplace Challenge, please visit: www.businesspartners2convince.org.