USCIB Applauds Approval of OECD Principles on Artificial Intelligence

Washington, D.C., May 22, 2019 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), applauds the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) approval on May 22 of the OECD Principles on Artificial Intelligence (AI). Working through Business at OECD (BIAC), a core group of USCIB members participated in a special, 50+ member experts group that was convened to scope these principles. They contributed directly to the development of five complementary, values-based principles for the responsible development and stewardship of trustworthy AI and five recommendations for public policy and international cooperation.

Importantly, these principles are not prescriptive. They highlight human-centered values, fairness, transparency, robust security, and accountability as foundational elements for AI deployment that will ensure inclusive growth, sustainable development and well-being. The principles, which were developed through multistakeholder dialogue involving input from business, government, civil society, the technical community, and labor unions, also recognize the appropriate role of governments in creating an enabling environment for research and development to drive innovation in trustworthy AI. They call upon governments to develop mechanisms to share data and knowledge and programs to equip people with digital skills so they can transition to new employment that will harness AI for economic and societal good. The OECD’s 36 member countries, along with Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru and Romania, who signed up to the AI Principles at the organization’s annual Ministerial Council Meeting today in Paris, further agreed to cooperate across borders and sectors to share information, and develop international, interoperable standards to ensure safe, fair and trustworthy AI.

“USCIB is honored that its members played a direct role in shaping principles that will enable us to tap the extraordinary potential of Artificial Intelligence in a manner that will improve economic and societal well-being across diverse sectors such as energy and the environment, healthcare, and transportation, to name a few,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “Perhaps most important, these principles include important safeguards that keep human-centered values at the core of AI deployment and prevail upon all ‘AI actors’ to respect democratic values throughout the AI system lifecycle, commit to transparency, and to demonstrate accountability, among other responsibilities. We see a bright future ahead and look forward to the adoption of these principles by OECD members and non-members alike,” added Robinson.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043, jhuneke@uscib.org

Nobody Wins in Escalation of U.S.-China Trade Fight, Says USCIB

Washington, D.C., May 8, 2019 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most successful global companies, appealed to the United States and China to ratchet down their trade fight in the wake of President Trump‘s decision to increase duties on some $200 billion of Chinese exports from 10 percent to 25 percent.

“When the U.S. and China fight, nobody wins, as the past year’s market gyrations, lost deals, and strained diplomatic ties have made abundantly clear,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “American business continues to have major problems with China’s commercial policies, but we simply must find a way to tackle these that doesn’t turn our most competitive companies into collateral damage.”

Robinson continued: “The earlier rounds of tariffs, coupled with China’s retaliatory measures, are already a significant strain on U.S. consumers, and on the economy as a whole. This latest U.S. escalation, and the inevitable Chinese response will impose considerable additional strains on our exporters and on companies, workers and communities that rely on international trade to succeed.”

Robinson urged the Trump administration to work more closely with key U.S. trading partners and with the business community to address serious Chinese trade abuses, including referring U.S. complaints to the World Trade Organization.

“The U.S. has won some important victories, including against discriminatory Chinese practices and policies, in the WTO lately,” he noted. “We should use the multilateral platform as it was intended to be used, to defuse escalating trade tensions, and to end the uncertainty that is rattling markets and fraying the nerves of both business owners and consumers.”

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
jhuneke@uscib.org, +1 212.703.5043

International Chamber of Commerce Prepares to Launch Incoterms® 2020

Paris and New York, April 22, 2019 – The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) is preparing for the publication of Incoterms® 2020, an update of the renowned regulations that define the responsibilities of buyers and sellers operating in the international trade system, according to ICC’s American national committee, the United States Council for International Business (USCIB).

Facilitating trillions of dollars in global trade each year, the “international commercial terms,” or Incoterms® rules, are a commonly accepted set of definitions and rules governing commercial trade activity.

“The revised Incoterms® rules will have a direct impact on traders throughout the United States and the world,” according to USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “It will be important for everyone involved in cross-border business to familiarize themselves with the changes. We will be working to educate our members and the business community at large on the most important changes.”

Nearly a century ago, following a series of studies conducted in the 1920s, the Paris-based ICC concluded that there was a need for the creation of a common protocol for importers and exporters everywhere. The first set of Incoterms® rules was published by ICC in 1936. Since then, ICC has periodically revised the Incoterms® rules to reflect changes in the international trade system.

For the past decade, Incoterms® 2010 has provided critical guidance to importers, exporters, lawyers, transporters and insurers across the world. ICC is preparing for the official release of Incoterms® 2020 later this year.

USCIB said that, joining with ICC chapters around the world, it plans to roll out training programs and seminars alongside the worldwide publication of the new terms.

“Now more than ever, participants in the global trading system require guidance and clarity,” Robinson said. “With the emergence of new technologies, government policies, and environmental regulations, Incoterms® 2020 will provide a common framework for the future of trade.”

USCIB has established a central information page on its website for all the latest developments surrounding the introduction of Incoterms® 2020. Go to uscib.org/about-incoterms-2020 for more information.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, including ICC, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
jhuneke@uscib.org, +1 212.703.5043

 

Global Business Endorses the ICN Framework for Competition Agency Procedures

Washington, D.C., April 10, 2019 – The Association of Corporate Counsel (ACC), the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the Association of in-house competition lawyers (ICLA), and the U.S. Council for International Business (USCIB) welcome the announced approval of the International Competition Network (ICN) Framework for Competition Agency Procedures (CAP), as an encouraging step towards a more sound and fair competition enforcement across the globe.

The CAP highlights and reinforces important due process principles in competition law investigations such as transparency and predictability, confidentiality, conflict of interest, representation by counsel, appropriate notice, privilege, independent review and reasonable time period for investigations. Competition agencies, businesses and consumers around the globe, all stand to gain from reinforcement of these core principles.

The CAP’s endorsement of non-discrimination in antitrust enforcement is key in today’s global marketplace and addresses a pertinent issue at the interface of competition law and trade law.

Our members hope that most, if not all, competition agencies opt into the CAP in the near future. We believe implementation of the CAP principles is key in any sound competition enforcement regime.

“The broad spread of antitrust regimes globally has highlighted the need for due process standards that support sound and predictable competition enforcement,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson. “We hope the CAP will bring the world’s competition agencies together in supporting a robust unified definition of basic fairness principles in competition investigations.”

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043, jhuneke@uscib.org

USCIB Lays Out Priorities for WTO Modernization

Washington, D.C., March 13, 2019 – Responding to this week’s hearing in the Senate Finance Committee on the future of the World Trade Organization, the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most successful global companies, has submitted a business roadmap for the WTO laying out priorities for the organization’s modernization.

“The continued existence and effectiveness of the WTO is vital to U.S. business,” stated USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson and USCIB Trade and Investment Committee Chair Charles R. Johnston in their transmittal letter.

“The WTO is a cornerstone of the global rules-based trading system and has helped spread growth and development for decades. The WTO’s existing agreements, such as those on intellectual property rights, sanitary and phytosanitary measures, and technical barriers to trade, provide practical commercial benefits for business because they establish global frameworks of rules designed to facilitate international trade.”

USCIB’s roadmap focuses on addressing subsidies and other market-distorting support provided to state-owned enterprises, the establishment of new rules for current issues such as digital trade and customs processes on electronic transmissions, and ensuring a properly functioning appellate body, among other issues.

The statement notes that the U.S. has been a major beneficiary of the WTO’s dispute settlement system, bringing and winning more cases than any other WTO member. “In fact, the U.S. has prevailed in over 90% of the complaints it filed,” USCIB observed.

USCIB urged WTO members to actively solicit the views of the business community, which undertakes the vast majority of cross-border trade and investment that is impacted by WTO rules. “The private sector has a direct stake in the rules that will be the outcome of the government-to-government discussions and, accordingly, private sector comments and recommendations should be actively solicited and given careful consideration,” the statement said.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043, jhuneke@uscib.org

 

Conference to Help Policymakers Navigate Fast-Evolving Digital Economy

Washington, D.C., February 26, 2019 – With the digital economy delivering innovations at breakneck speed, how can policymakers maximize the beneficial impacts of new technologies and business models, while also addressing challenges they may create? This is the fundamental question to be tackled at a March 25 conference in Washington, D.C.: “Going Digital: OECD Insights for a Changing World.”

The conference, a joint program of the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), Business at OECD (BIAC) and the 36-nation Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), will bring together an array of experts from business, government, the technical community and civil society.

“Since the OECD launched its Going Digital project two years ago, it has sought to help policymakers foster an environment that enables national economies and societies to prosper in a world that is increasingly digital and data-driven,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson. “This conference will provide a first readout of discussions at the OECD’s pivotal Going Digital Summit, which takes place March 11-12 in Paris, while also serving as a platform for discussion of developments in the digital economy from an American perspective.”

Topics for discussion include:

  • Making the Digital Transformation Work for Growth and Well-Being
  • The OECD’s “Going Digital” Policy Recommendations: From Paper to Practice
  • Securing the Digital Economy rom Cyber-Threats
  • Harnessing Artificial Intelligence for Economic and Social Prosperity

Confirmed speakers for the conference include:

  • Andrew Wyckoff, director of the OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation
  • Robert Strayer, deputy assistant secretary for cyber and international communications and information policy, U.S. Department of State
  • David Redl, administrator of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), U.S. Department of Commerce
  • Gail Slater, special assistant to the president for technology, telecommunications and cybersecurity policy, National Economic Council, The White House
  • Lynne Parker, assistant director for artificial intelligence, Office of Science and Technology, The White House

Held at the AT&T Forum for Technology, Entertainment and Policy, this event is the latest in the Joseph H. Alhadeff Digital Economy Conference Series, named in honor of the late Oracle Corp. executive who provided crucial business leadership on digital economy topics at the OECD and in many other forums.

More information is available on the conference website.

About USCIB:

USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, including BIAC, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:

Jonathan Huneke, USCIB

jhuneke@uscib.org, +1 212.703.5043

 

Broad-Based Business Coalition to Press for USMCA Adoption

Washington, D.C., February 26, 2019 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most successful global companies, has joined with an array of U.S. companies and industry associations to urge swift approval by Congress of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), an updated and modernized framework for expanded trade, investment and market integration in North America.

The USMCA Coalition, encompassing more than 200 leading companies and major associations representing farmers and ranchers, manufacturers, service providers and technology companies, was formally launched today. Click here to read the coalition’s statement on the launch.

“USCIB is proud to count itself among the many vocal American business supporters of the USMCA,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “The success of our economy depends upon a reliable framework for cross-border trade and investment among our three integrated economies, and the USCMA makes important improvements over the earlier NAFTA framework. We intend to press for speedy approval on Capitol Hill.”

Robinson added that USCIB would also work closely with its counterpart organizations in Canada and Mexico, as well as with its global business network, to advance the USMCA as well as open, rules-based trade and investment regimes more broadly.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043, jhuneke@uscib.org

 

Application of ATA Carnet System Expands in China

New York, N.Y., January 23, 2019 – China has significantly expanded its use of ATA Carnets for the temporary, duty-free importation of various types of goods. As of January 9, the country is now accepting the widely used “merchandise passports” for professional equipment and product samples, according to the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which administers the ATA system in the United States.

Previously the country honored ATA Carnets just for goods destined for trade shows and exhibitions. China also extended the period for which goods may be brought into the country under ATA Carnets to a full year, from six months as had previously been the case.

“We expect China’s decision to accept Carnets for the full range of uses to significantly expand American exports to the country,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “Carnet usage is often a leading indicator of future exports, and this move will make the process of getting goods to and from the country much smoother.”

ATA Carnets are internationally recognized customs documents that allow for the temporary importation of various types of goods, duty-free and tax-free, generally for up to one year. They are used by a wide variety of exporters and businesses as a simple, cost-effective means of moving goods temporarily to 78 countries and customs territories around the world. Additional information on developments related to the use of ATA Carnets in China is available on USCIB’s website here.

The worldwide ATA Carnet system is overseen by the World Customs Organization and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), for which USCIB serves as the American national committee. Find out more about the services offered by USCIB to facilitate cross-border trade and investment at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, VP communications, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043 or jhuneke@uscib.org

About USCIB:
The United States Council for International Business (USCIB) promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide.

As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, including ICC, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide. USCIB also works to facilitate international trade and investment. It is the U.S. national guaranteeing association for ATA Carnets, which enable the temporary export of many types of goods, free of import duties or taxes, for up to one year.

USCIB Welcomes Signing of US-Mexico-Canada Agreement

Washington, D.C., November 30, 2018 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most successful global companies, issued the following statement on the Trump administration’s signing of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), the update to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA):

“USCIB welcomes the signing of the USMCA, which was successfully concluded last month. The agreement contains several provisions important to our members, recognizing the many changes in the North American and global economies since the original NAFTA was signed a quarter-century ago. Modernized provisions including those on digital trade and customs are key to allowing U.S. companies to continue to thrive in the North American market.

“We commend the parties for recognizing the importance of keeping the region economically integrated, allowing North American companies to remain competitive in the global market.

“Cross-border investment is a key driver for economic growth and development for our members. We are therefore concerned that the USMCA includes provisions that will reduce investment protection in some areas. In addition, we note other changes in areas such as government procurement and de minimis that fall short in providing U.S. business the best framework for growth.

“USCIB members look forward to implementation of the agreement in a manner that addresses our key concerns and priorities in lowering barriers to cross-border trade and investment. We continue to support a seamless transition to the new agreement, allowing the existing supply chains to remain intact.”

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043, jhuneke@uscib.org

Unilever CEO Paul Polman to Be Honored by USCIB at Annual Gala

New York, N.Y., November 20, 2018Paul Polman, chief executive officer of Unilever, will be honored by the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s leading global companies, at the organization’s 2018 International Leadership Award Dinner. The gala event will be held on December 11 at the Delegates Dining Room at the United Nations HQ in New York City, under the theme “Business and Society: Creating Shared Value.”

“Under Paul Polman’s leadership, Unilever has worked tirelessly to decouple its growth from its environmental footprint and to increase the company’s positive social impact,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson. “Paul has actively sought to drive transformative change across sectors to implement long-term, sustainable business models. As chair of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), one of USCIB’s key global business partners, he is demonstrating vigorous business leadership on the international stage, both on sustainability and on a host of other issues.”

Polman has served as Unilever’s CEO since 2009. In addition to his chairmanship of ICC, he is a member of the International Business Council of the World Economic Forum, chair of The B Team, vice chair of the UN Global Compact, and a board member of the Consumer Goods Forum. Polman also served until recently as chair of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development.

Established in 1980, USCIB’s International Leadership Award is presented annually to a leading CEO, international figure or institution, recognizing outstanding contributions to global trade, finance and investment, and to improving the global competitive framework in which American business operates. Recent recipients have included Ajay Banga of Mastercard and Randall Stephenson of AT&T. The annual USCIB award dinner attracts hundreds of top business executives, policy makers and members of the diplomatic community.  More information on the event is available at www.uscibgala.com.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043, jhuneke@uscib.org