COVID-19 Responses: Our Global Network

USCIB is pleased to share the work being done related to COVID-19 across the world by our global network. For information on what USCIB member companies are doing to curb the impacts of COVID-19, visit our dedicated Member Responses page.

Table of Contents:

International Chamber of Commerce (ICC)
International Organization of Employers (IOE)
Business at OECD
Intergovernmental Forums

International Chamber of Commerce (ICC)

Latest ICC News and Statements on COVID-19:

  • ICC launched a new global campaign, #SaveOurSMEs, to help Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) survive the COVID-19 pandemic. In a co-signed message to the ICC network, ICC Secretary General John Denton and ICC World Chambers Federation (WCF) Chair Hamad Buamim called on the ICC network to widely share the  ‘SOS’ Call to Action and engage with media using these campaign key messages.
  • While recognizing the essential role the private sector can play in minimizing the likelihood of transmission, a joint ICC-WHO statement calls on national governments to adopt a whole-of-government and whole-of-society approach in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, and underscores the urgency for Heads of State and Government to make preventing the spread of the virus a top priority.

Recordings and presentations of recent virtual sessions:

  • ICC’s educational arm, the ICC Academy, will be hosting a series of livecasts and webinars on COVID-19 in the coming weeks, free of charge. As part of the COVID-19 response, the series will focus on three core areas: healtheconomy, and at a later stage: recovery.

International Organization of Employers (IOE)

The COVID-19 pandemic is causing significant disruption, threatening millions of lives and livelihoods.

IOE is mobilizing its network to provide information on business and employer organizations’ efforts to support members with safety and health measures,  preventive actions to minimize disruption to productivity, strategies for mitigation of financial losses, and overview of government initiatives to reduce economic stress on business.

IOE is providing information based on regions (Americas, Africa, Asia, Europe and Central Asia), virtual conferences, and key documents from its global network. For more general information visit IOE’s dedicated page on COVID-19.


Latest IOE News and Statements on COVID-19:

  • The IOE and the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) and their constituents stand in solidarity with governments and underline the critical need for social dialogue at national and multilateral levels to design measures to overcome the impact of COVID-19. The two organizations have released a joint statementwhich contains several call of action points on business continuity, income security, social dialogue, policy coordination and coherence. The statement also notes that the 2019 ILO Centenary Declaration for the Future of Work contains critical elements.

Recordings and presentations of recent virtual sessions:

Business at OECD

Business at OECD (BIAC) believes it is now more important than ever that the OECD delivers the best policy advice both on short-term collective response measures, as well as the longer-term recovery plans that will soon need to be implemented. The extensive experience of the OECD, from its origins emerging from the Marshall Plan implementation to the 2008-2009 global financial crisis, makes the organization a unique forum to help governments achieve an effective balance between the health and economic needs of society. Evidence-based analysis, enhanced best practice sharing and improved coordinated collective actions will prove decisive.

Initial OECD analysis on COVID-19:

For more information on what the OECD and Business at OECD (BIAC) are doing related to COVID-19, please visit their website: http://biac.org/coronavirus/.

 

Intergovernmental Forums (IGOs)

United Nations

  • The United Nations published a report titled “Shared Responsibility, Global Solidarity: Responding to the socio-economic impacts of COVID-19“. The report is a call to action, for the immediate health response required to suppress transmission of the virus to end the pandemic and to tackle the many social and economic dimensions of this crisis. It is a call to focus on people – women, youth, low-wage workers, small and medium enterprises, the informal sector and on vulnerable groups who are already at risk. Pages 6-7 of the report features a section on “Businesses and Corporations: Step Up to the Challenge
  • USCIB’s biweekly memo on “Business at the UN” flags events and decision points relevant to members, passes on intelligence and indicates next steps for business-relevant UN workstreams. If you would like to receive the memo, please contact: Claudia Herbert Colfer (ccolfer@uscib.org).

USCIB and Business Fights Poverty Host Virtual Session on COVID-19 Business Impact

How can business best deal with the COVID-19 challenge? In an effort to answer this critical question, USCIB partnered with Business Fights Poverty (BFP) to host an online “challenge” discussion on March 19. USCIB Vice President for Innovation and Product Policy Mike Michener was on the panel, joined by USCIB policy staff and representatives of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the International Organization of Employers (IOE) and Business at OECD.

The USCIB Foundation’s Business Partners for Sustainable Development (BPSD) initiative Executive Director Dr. Scott Ratzan joined BFP’s Co-founder and CEO Zahid Torres-Rahman and Harvard Kennedy School’s Myriam Sidibe for the online discussion, supported by a panel of leading executives from business, civil society, the United Nations and the UK government. The discussion began with an evaluation of the current situation, and the impact on business and others. This was followed by dialogue on the immediate priorities for business, including best practices.  The panel ended by weighing how business can partner with others to support immediate action, and well as longer-term resilience.

Michener said, “We are all in this together, and partnerships are key to solving all of the problems posed by this crisis – health, economic, and protecting the most vulnerable. I appreciated the opportunity to engage in the valuable BFP discussion, and I look forward to continuing the conversation.”

The USCIB Foundation’s program, Business Partnership for Sustainable Development, with Business Fights Poverty.

USCIB Talks OECD Accession With New US Ambassador to Brazil   

Todd C. Chapman

USCIB trade and investment policy staffers Shaun Donnelly and Eva Hampl had an introductory conference call on March 19 with the recently-confirmed new U.S. Ambassador to Brazil Todd Chapman and State Department Brazil Desk Economist Ben Kalt.  Ambassador Chapman, with whom USCIB worked in the past during Chapman’s earlier appointment as U.S. Ambassador to Ecuador, had hoped to meet in person with USCIB staff and member companies but settled for an introductory call in light of COVID-19 precautions.

According to Donnelly, the Ambassador assured USCIB that the Brazil’s Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) accession process will be at the top of his policy agenda throughout his assignment in Brazil.

Donnelly and Hampl outlined USCIB’s role in the OECD accession process, serving as the official voice of U.S. business in all OECD matters, directly and as the U.S. affiliate of the Business at OECD (known as BIAC) business coalition on the ground at the OECD.

“We shared our experiences with the OECD, BIAC, the U.S. Government, the government of Colombia and business leaders on Colombia’s recent OECD accession,” said Donnelly. “We discussed possible modalities for embassy-USCIB cooperation throughout the OECD accession process as well as ways both USCIB and the embassy might work most effectively with CNI, which is Brazil’s largest and most influential business organization.”

USCIB has also worked extensively with CNI–as national committee partners in Business at OECD, as well as in the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the International Organization of Employers (IOE) and the Major Economies Business Forum (BizMEF) for climate change.

Ambassador Chapman enthusiastically signed up for a meeting with USCIB member companies on one of his early return visits to Washington after he gets settled in Brasilia.

The OECD accession process is a comprehensive, rigorous, and lengthy process, often running three to five years or more, with more than a dozen OECD committees and other bodies each carefully reviewing the candidate country’s laws, regulations, and practices to confirm they are in line with OECD standards.  When all relevant OECD committees and subsidiary bodies are satisfied by the applicant’s “like-mindedness” and commitment to OECD standards, the OECD “Council” of thirty-six ambassadors can formally approve the accession and invite the candidate country to file its binding acceptance of membership.

According to Donnelly, given Brazil’s prominent role in the global economy and, frankly, its history of barriers to foreign goods, services and investments, Brazil’s candidacy will likely attract great interest from OECD member governments and the Business at OECD coalition.  USCIB will be at the head of the line in that business effort.  The Brazil accession case has some important unique aspects, probably most important the strong early endorsement from President Trump personally.

If you have questions, concerns, or recommendations concerning Brazil OECD accession process, please contact Eva Hampl (ehampl@uscib.org) or Shaun Donnelly (sdonnelly@uscib.org).

COVID-19 Responses: USCIB Members

USCIB is pleased to share initiatives that member companies are doing to address the COVID-19 crisis. We’ll be updating this page daily, so check back often for more spotlights.

Featured Companies:

Mastercard

Apple

Salesforce

Microsoft

HanesBrand

USCIB Member Mastercard Partners With Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Wellcome to Speed Development and Access to Therapies for COVID-19

Quick Summary:
COVID-19 Therapeutics Accelerator will coordinate R&D efforts and remove barriers to drug development and scale-up to address the epidemic.
Mastercard partnered with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Wellcome. Together the partners committed up to $125 million in seed funding to speed-up the response to COVID-19 by identifying, assessing, developing and scaling-up treatments.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Wellcome and Mastercard announced on March 10 a commitment of up to $125 million in seed funding to speed-up the response to the COVID-19 epidemic by identifying, assessing, developing, and scaling-up treatments. The partners are committed to equitable access, including making products available and affordable in low-resource settings. The COVID-19 Therapeutics Accelerator will play a catalytic role by accelerating and evaluating new and repurposed drugs and biologics to treat patients with COVID-19 in the immediate term, and other viral pathogens in the longer-term. Currently there are no broad-spectrum antivirals or immunotherapies available for the fight against emerging pathogens, and none approved for use on COVID-19.

The COVID-19 Therapeutics Accelerator will work with the World Health Organization, government and private sector funders and organizations, as well as the global regulatory and policy-setting institutions. The Accelerator will have an end-to-end focus, from drug pipeline development through manufacturing and scale-up. By sharing research, coordinating investments, and pooling resources, these efforts can help to accelerate research. This kind of collaboration was a key lesson from the 2014 Ebola outbreak. By providing fast and flexible funding at key stages of the development process, the Accelerator will de-risk the pathway for new drugs and biologics for COVID-19 and future epidemic threats, ensuring access in lower-resource countries.

While antiviral drugs are approved to lessen the severity of seasonal flu and treat HIV, among other viral diseases, none have demonstrated efficacy against the current epidemic. One reason for the lack of effective treatments is that products may not have an immediate market, which can slow or prevent their research and commercial development. The COVID-19 Therapeutics Accelerator is designed to help by bringing together resources and expertise to lower the financial and technical risk for academia, biotech, and pharmaceutical companies, while ensuring that these products are accessible and affordable to people in low-resource settings. The expertise of pharmaceutical companies will be critical in identifying, researching, and commercializing successful drugs.

“We’re proud to join this crucial effort to combat COVID-19 in furtherance of our commitment to inclusive growth,” said Mike Froman, vice chairman of Mastercard. “This global challenge not only represents a risk to the health and safety of populations all over the world, but also poses a potential disruption to the economic vitality of millions of people, businesses, and organizations worldwide. Our experience with financial inclusion shows us the importance of building a network of parties who bring not only their capital, but complementary assets and skill sets to the table, and we welcome other partners concerned about inclusive growth to join this effort.”

For the full story, please visit Mastercard’s press page.

Member Spotlight: Apple Develops COVID-19 Screening App

Quick Summary:
Apple’s new COVID-19 website, and COVID-19 app available on the App Store, were created in partnership with the CDC, the White House Coronavirus Task Force and FEMA to make it easy for people across the country to get trusted information and guidance at a time when the US is feeling the heavy burden of COVID-19.
Consistent with Apple’s strong dedication to user privacy, the COVID-19 app and website were built to keep all user data private and secure.

Apple released a new screening tool and set of resources on March 27 to help people stay informed and take the proper steps to protect their health during the spread of COVID-19, based on the latest CDC guidance. The new COVID-19 website, and COVID-19 app available on the App Store, were created in partnership with the CDC, the White House Coronavirus Task Force and FEMA to make it easy for people across the country to get trusted information and guidance at a time when the US is feeling the heavy burden of COVID-19.

The COVID-19 app and website allow users to answer a series of questions around risk factors, recent exposure and symptoms for themselves or a loved one. In turn, they will receive CDC recommendations on next steps, including guidance on social distancing and self-isolating, how to closely monitor symptoms, whether or not a test is recommended at this time, and when to contact a medical provider. This new screening tool is designed to be a resource for individuals and does not replace instructions from healthcare providers or guidance from state and local health authorities.

Along with the new COVID-19 app and website, customers across the US may also ask Siri, “How do I know if I have coronavirus?” to access guidance and resources from the CDC and a curated collection of telehealth apps available on the App Store. This week, travelers landing at select international airports throughout the US started receiving notifications on their iPhone to remind them of current CDC guidance to stay home and monitor their health.

Consistent with Apple’s strong dedication to user privacy, the COVID-19 app and website were built to keep all user data private and secure. The tools do not require a sign-in or association with a user’s Apple ID, and users’ individual responses will not be sent to Apple or any government organization.

Although the screen tool is a resource to evaluate level of risk and recognizing when symptoms are severe, it is not meant to replace any guidelines or instructions from health officials. To learn more about Apple’s new app release, please see here.

Member Spotlight: Salesforce Efforts to Help Those Affected by COVID-19

Quick Summary:
Salesforce donated $3 million to several organizations.
Salesforce is making some of its technology available for free to help customers and partners navigate through the crisis while also launching rapid response solutions to help companies and employees, customers and communities, as well as providing access to Health Cloud for healthcare systems experiencing an influx of COVID-19 requests.

To support the global response to COVID-19, Salesforce has donated $3 million to UCSF’s COVID-19 Response Fund, the CDC Foundation’s Emergency Response Fund and San Francisco’s Give2SF Fund. As always, the company is also matching employee donations to eligible organizations.


Salesforce is also making some of its technology available for free for a period of time to help its customers and partners navigate through the crisis. The company launched Salesforce Care rapid response solutions to help companies stay connected to their employees, customers and communities. This is in addition to making Quip Starter available to any business and providing access to Health Cloud for healthcare systems experiencing an influx of COVID-19 requests. And organizations around the world are using Tableau’s COVID-19 data hub to see and understand data about the pandemic.

More updates on the initiatives Salesforce is taking during the COVID-19 crisis, please click here.

Member Spotlight: Microsoft’s COVID-19 Assessment Bot Eliminates Bottlenecks

Quick Summary:

Microsoft’s Healthcare Bot uses AI to help CDC and other organizations respond to inquiries, freeing up doctors, nurses, administrators to provide critical care to those who need it.
The need to screen patients with any number of symptoms — to determine who has high enough risk factors to need access to limited medical resources and which people may more safely care for themselves at home — is a bottleneck that threatens to overwhelm health systems coping with the crisis.

Microsoft is offering its Healthcare Bot service, powered by Microsoft Azure, to organizations on the frontlines of the COVID-19 response to help screen patients for potential infection and care. One such organization is the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which recently released a COVID-19 assessment bot that can quickly assess the symptoms and risk factors for people worried about infection, provide information and suggest a next course of action, such as contacting a medical provider or, for those who do not need in-person medical care, managing the illness safely at home.

The bot, which utilizes Microsoft’s Healthcare Bot service, is available on the CDC website.

Public health organizations, hospitals and others on the frontlines of the COVID-19 response need to be able to respond to inquiries, provide the public with up-to-date outbreak information, track exposure, quickly triage new cases and guide next steps.  Many have expressed great concern about the overwhelming demand COVID-19 is creating on resources such as urgent, emergency and nursing care.

In particular, the need to screen patients with any number of cold or flu-like symptoms — to determine who has high enough risk factors to need access to limited medical resources and which people may more safely care for themselves at home — is a bottleneck that threatens to overwhelm health systems coping with the crisis.

Microsoft’s Healthcare Bot service is one solution that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to help the CDC and other frontline organizations respond to these inquiries, freeing up doctors, nurses, administrators and other healthcare professionals to provide critical care to those who need it.

The Healthcare Bot service is a scalable Azure-based public cloud service that allows organizations to quickly build and deploy an AI-powered bot for websites or applications that can offer patients or the general public personalized access to health-related information through a natural conversation experience. It can be easily customized to suit an organization’s own scenarios and protocols.

To read more about Microsoft’s Healthcare Bot service visit Microsoft’s Official Blog

Member Spotlight: HanesBrands to Manufacture Cotton Masks

Quick Summary:
HanesBrands expects to produce about 1.5 million FDA-approved masks weekly, while the consortium of other apparel manufacturers that HanesBrands joined is expected to, as a whole, ramp up production of 5-6 million masks weekly.
Using U.S.-grown cotton, the masks are being produced in Hanesbrands’ sewing factories in El Salvador, Honduras and the Dominican Republic.

USCIB member HanesBrands Inc. announced that it will begin producing FDA-approved cotton masks at some of its factories in Latin America as part of a federal contract to combat a national shortage of face masks resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.

The company joined a cooperative consortium of other apparel manufacturers, led by Parkdale Mills America, that are dedicating manufacturing capacity to meet U.S. demand for masks. HanesBrands expects to produce about 1.5 million masks weekly, and the consortium as a whole is expected to ramp up production of five to six million masks weekly using HanesBrands’ design and patterns.

The announcement came Saturday, March 21, during President Donald Trump’s media briefing about the federal government’s response. The company went from negotiating a contract with the federal government to beginning production in less than a week, according to a company spokesman.

Using U.S.-grown cotton, the masks are being produced in Hanesbrands’ sewing factories in El Salvador, Honduras and the Dominican Republic.

These factories would normally be producing T-shirts, underwear, socks, sweatpants and sweatshirts.

More information can be found here: https://hanesforgood.com/inthistogether/

Business at OECD Head Shares 2020 Policy Priorities With USCIB

Business at OECD’s Russel Mills (left, center) with IOE’s Shea GoPaul and USCIB policy staff

Secretary General of Business at OECD (BIAC) Russel Mills visited USCIB’s Washington DC and New York offices the week of February 3 to update staff on Business at OECD and OECD priorities for the year.

Mills shared that environment, biodiversity, plastics and climate change issues are moving to the top of the agenda, however there will also be a mushrooming of digitization plans and digital economy work related to changing business models and digitally enabled companies. Mills also noted that policies around digital taxation and re-skilling will be on top of the agenda for both organizations.

“We really valued our time with Russel, which gave us an opportunity to touch base on our respective organizations’ policy priorities,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “USCIB looks forward to a productive year working with BIAC to help drive the work of the OECD.”

USCIB Celebrates ILO at Annual Leadership Award Gala

L-R: Peter Robinson (USCIB), Laura Rubbo (The Walt Disney Company), Guy Ryder (ILO), Terry McGraw (USCIB and formerly The McGraw-Hill Companies)

In celebration of The International Labor Organization’s (ILO) centennial this year, USCIB honored the ILO and its Director-General Guy Ryder with its annual International Leadership Award yesterday evening, December 16. The gala event was held at the Lotte New York Palace, under the theme “Resilient Institutions That Matter.” Representatives from business, the United Nations, government and special guests attended the dinner, which also recognized the centennials of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) this past year, and the upcoming centennial of the International Organization of Employers (IOE) in 2020. Esteemed guests included USCIB Chairman Terry McGraw, IOE Secretary-General Roberto Suarez Santos, ICC Permanent Representative to the UN Andrew Wilson, Acting U.S. Representative to the UN Economic and Social Council Jason Mack, Chief of Staff of the UN Global Compact Melissa Powell, Permanent Observer of the OECD to the UN Robin Ogilvy, Executive Director of the UN Office for Partnerships Rob Skinner, Chief of the Intergovernmental Policy and Review Branch for the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs Irena Zubcevic and many others.

“Imagine what we could accomplish if all stakeholders are at the table working to improve education, reduce poverty, ensure social protection, provide job opportunities and tackle such challenges as climate change and environmental protection,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter M. Robinson in his opening remarks. One thing we do know at USCIB, and that is if we are to find solutions to those challenges…business is an essential partner.”

UN Under Secretary General and Special Advisor on Preparations for the UN’s 75th anniversary Fabrizio Hochschild agreed, recognizing the essential role of business and global cooperation in his remarks at the gala as the UN looks towards the next twenty-five years: “We hope to have strong voices from the business community. We want to hear from you about how we perform for the next twenty-five years.”

Throughout the course of the evening USCIB presented videos honoring the influential roles of the ICC, IOE and ILO over the past century.

Established in 1919 in the waning days of World War I, the ILO’s founders believed that universal peace could only come about if it was based on social justice.

USCIB Chairman Terry McGraw presents the USCIB International Leadership Award to ILO Director General Guy Ryder

“On behalf of the ILO, I am extremely honored by this award. The recognition and support of your influential organization is especially valuable in these uncertain times, when technology, climate change, globalization and demographics are all reshaping the worlds of enterprise and work,” said Ryder. “By continuing our cooperation, I am confident that we can meet this existential challenge and create a new model of business and employment that is human-centered, equitable and sustainable.” Ryder also joined The Walt Disney Company’s Laura Rubbo in a fireside chat, during which he highlighted ILO’s achievements and shared the organization’s priorities for the future.

Ryder was elected as ILO Director-General by the ILO’s Governing Body in May 2012 and took office on October 1, 2012. Since then, Ryder has launched a reform process geared towards assuring the ILO’s authority on matters falling within its mandate. Ryder was re-elected by the ILO’s tripartite Governing Body on November 7, 2016, and his second term started on October 1, 2017. The main aims of the ILO are to promote rights at work, encourage decent employment opportunities, enhance social protection and strengthen dialogue on work-related issues. The unique tripartite structure of the ILO is intended to give an equal voice to workers, employers and governments so that the views of the social partners are closely reflected in labor standards and in shaping policies and programs.

Established in 1980, USCIB’s International Leadership Award is presented annually to a leading CEO, international figure or institution, recognizing outstanding contributions to global trade, finance and investment, and to improving the global competitive framework in which American business operates. Recent recipients have included Paul Polman of Unilever (Chairman of ICC), Ajay Banga of Mastercard and Randall Stephenson of AT&T. The annual USCIB award dinner attracts hundreds of top business executives, policy makers and members of the diplomatic community.

UN Climate Talks: Prominent Business Group Holds Dialogue, Welcomes New Members

USCIB’s Norine Kennedy

As in previous years, USCIB joined its global business partners to hold a Major Economies Business Forum (BizMEF) Business Dialogue during a United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) conference. This year’s UNFCCC 25th Conference of the Parties (COP25) is taking place in Madrid, Spain under the Chilean presidency.

This year’s Business Dialogue was hosted by the Spanish Confederation of Employers (CEOE) on December 8. Reaching an important milestone, this year’s Dialogue commemorated twenty-five years of business cooperation and involvement in the UN climate process. The latest Dialogue served as an important forum of discussion for emerging issues and institutional changes that are necessary to mobilize business knowhow and resources at every stage of climate policy and action.

BizMEF Business Dialogue at COP25

Senior government representatives of Chile, the European Commission, France, Japan, and the United Kingdom joined World Trade Organization (WTO), International Organization of Employers (IOE) and UNFCCC speakers at the Dialogue to share perspectives on integrated policy options inside and outside the UN climate process.

“We are here to mark this as what it must be – a turning point and inspiration to do even more and better, as well as involve more companies of all sectors sizes and nationalities on board,” said USCIB Vice President of Strategic International Engagement, Energy and Environment Norine Kennedy.

BizMEF members include major national and regional multi-sectoral business groups in developed and developing countries.  At the COP25 Business Dialogue, BizMEF welcomed two new partner organizations: CEOE and the Santiago Chamber of Commerce. USCIB serves as the Secretariat for BizMEF.

Please refer to USCIB’s COP25 Statement for more information on USCIB’s climate policy position.

OECD Works to Build Trust in Business

The OECD held its inaugural Trust in Business Forum in Paris October 1-2. The overarching initiative seeks to promote coordinated action to strengthen trust in the business ecosystem through capacity building solutions, research and knowledge creation, setting standards and guidelines and inspiring policy reform, and promoting partnerships.

Panelists and attendees, including USCIB’s Assistant Policy and Program Manager for CR and Labor Daniella Goncalves, discussed many facets of the trust gap, including why such a gap exists, what can be done to restore trust, the role of measuring and reporting on indicators that drive trust, governing professional services, and the importance of leadership in generating trust. Three concurrent break-out sessions covered the projects that are being piloted.

“The projects focus on moving beyond compliance by embedding a culture of trust within an organization, shaping compliance, best practices for State-owned enterprises (SOEs) and creating a due diligence guide for the energy sector,” reported Goncalves. “Organizers of this new initiative will be releasing a work-plan for the upcoming year soon.”

Following the Forum, the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) held its first ever joint meetings of the Commission on Corporate Responsibility and Anti-Corruption and the Commission on Energy and Environment October 3-4. Representatives from National Committees and enterprises assembled to learn about the ICC’s restructuring before having separate Commission meetings.

ICC has recently released a new work-plan that involves five-knowledge hubs, each with its own set of projects for which members of national committees can volunteer. ICC, in its discussion regarding the Revised Draft Treaty on Business and Human Rights, stated its intention to continue to align and work with both USCIB and the International Organization of Employers (IOE).

At ‘All In’ Event, Business Makes Case for Inclusive Multilateralism to Step Up SDG Action

Wade Warren, chief strategy officer, Deloitte gives opening remarks, alongside USCIB EVP for Strategy and Business Development Abby Shapiro

World leaders will gather for the 74th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA-74) in New York over the next two weeks to deliberate on the need to step up action on the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda, Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Climate Change. Many of these leaders from UN agencies, business and civil society, agree that not enough progress or scale has been achieved towards attaining SDG targets. Despite the private sector’s contribution on economic, environmental and social fronts towards delivering the SDGs, constraints to meaningful business engagement remain in some UN forums, hindering productive partnerships that could advance shared value and achieve common goals.

To highlight the importance of meaningful engagement by business in the UN system, USCIB, Deloitte and the International Organization of Employers (IOE) organized an ‘All In’ Conference on the importance of inclusive multilateralism and the role of business in achieving the SDGs. The conference was held at the  Millennium Hilton UN Plaza Hotel on September 11 and brought together over 70 representatives from UN Missions and agencies, U.S. government, civil society, NGO’s and the private sector to discuss ways to strengthen cooperation, share challenges and opportunities, and chart a course for a practical “2020 Action Plan for Inclusive Multilateralism and Business.”

Representative from Save the Children provides civil society perspective at ‘All In’ Conference

Throughout the day-long discussions, speakers and participants agreed that trust between governments, business and civil society has been strained yet remains a crucial foundation and success factor when building long-term, sustainable partnerships to address global challenges such as reskilling of workers, improving nutrition and eradicating poverty.

“If we were to achieve our aspirations, it would require all hands-on-deck, collective action and inclusive partnerships that mobilize resources and expertise,” said USCIB Executive Vice President, Strategy and Business Development Abby Shapiro. “Business can bring solutions, ability to scale and make much-needed investments in infrastructure. And we know that business can do well. We believe the SDGs present a unique prism to see what shared societal value means, especially in terms of social and environmental progress.”

Melissa Kopolow-McCall of AB InBev, a USCIB member, added a company perspective, “In some ways, our company is dependent on the SDGs to sustain its business model,” she said. “So partnerships are key – but it is not clear that all agree that partnerships are welcome or even a good thing. While some may believe that profit is incompatible with public good, we do not share that view.”

Participants also engaged in dialogue with Fabrizio Horchschild, special adviser to the UN Secretary General on preparations for the seventy-fifth United Nations anniversary, Austin Smith, acting U.S. representative to the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) and Robert Skinner, executive director of the UN Office for Partnerships.

USCIB Vice President, Strategic International Engagement, Energy and Environment Norine Kennedy moderated the day-long conference

USCIB Vice President for Environment, Energy and Strategic International Engagement Norine Kennedy presented USCIB’s two-year ‘All In’ initiative to focus on strengthening inclusive multilateralism through six elements comprising its Vision:

  1. Public-private partnerships for shared value
  2. Leverage public and private science & technology know-how
  3. Scale SDG solutions through supply and value chains
  4. Measure and monitor impact of SDG Action by Business
  5. Inclusive economic empowerment
  6. Investing in SDG infrastructure in all its forms

USCIB has convened meetings focusing on specific elements of the ‘All In Vision’ in Geneva in May, Bangkok in June and NYC in July and will consider how to continue the global conversation about institutional infrastructure and multi-stakeholder partnerships toward practical solutions that mobilize business, governments and the UN system.

Future of Work Event Explores Opportunities for Business

USCIB’s Peter Robinson makes opening remarks at the Future of Work workshop on September 5

As megatrends, such as technology, changing demographics and climate change, continue to disrupt the world of work at an accelerating pace, policy makers, business and international agencies have begun to explore opportunities for reskilling and retraining workers. This served as the framework for a joint, interactive workshop on the Future of Work on September 5 at the historic Evermay Estate in Washington DC.

Organized by The USCIB Foundation, the Global Apprenticeship Network (GAN), the International Organization of Employers (IOE), Wilton Park USA and the S&R Foundation, the workshop brought together business leaders for a candid discussion on challenges and opportunities. Throughout the discussions, USCIB members, including AT&T, Chevron, McDonalds, Nestle and PMI, shared insights on launching company-wide initiatives.

Welcoming the group, USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson said, “Today’s convening is at the intersection of policy and practice. Our goal is for everyone today to become informed about Future of Work policy, but more importantly, our goal is for you to come away inspired by the practical examples shared in the room by companies wrestling with these issues and converting them into positive opportunities for business, workers and society overall.”

IOE Adviser Akustina Morni

IOE Adviser Akustina Morni kicked off the discussions, providing a comprehensive overview of the regulatory landscape, future of work megatrends and recommendations, all of which are presented in a report created by IOE and The USCIB Foundation to inform the event.  Participants then moved through a series of topics on initiating, scaling, measuring and communicating about future of work programs.

“Apprenticeships were widely highlighted and cited as a potential way to skill, reskill and upskill a workforce, especially for mid-career professionals,” noted USCIB Vice President for Corporate Responsibility and Labor Affairs Gabriella Rigg Herzog. “What is most important is the opportunity to receive certification through an apprenticeship that will serve as recognized credential among employers.  While many different definitions of apprenticeships exist worldwide, their success, particularly in EU Member States, has provided a model to build from in the U.S. As the US government begins to examine establishing a more robust apprenticeship and credentialing program, business leaders will continue to work with stakeholders to meet the demands of the future of work.”

The organizers plan to hold follow-up discussions and will also produce an outcome report.