Despite Clampdown, High-Seas Piracy Still a Threat

piracyKidnapping and hostage-taking persists off the coasts of West Africa and South East Asia, despite a 20-year low in piracy on the world’s seas, according to new figures from the International Chamber of Commerce‘s International Maritime Bureau (IMB).

IMB’s latest global piracy report shows that pirates armed with guns or knives took 110 seafarers hostage in the first nine months of 2016, and kidnapped 49 crew for ransom. Nigeria, a growing hotspot for violent piracy and armed robbery, accounts for 26 percent of all captures, followed by Indonesia, Malaysia, Guinea and Ivory Coast.

But with just 42 attacks worldwide this quarter, maritime piracy is at its lowest since 1996. IMB’s Piracy Reporting Center has recorded 141 incidents so far this year, a 25 percent drop from the same period in 2015. A total of 111 vessels were boarded, five were hijacked, 10 were fired at, and a further 15 attacks were thwarted.

Read more on ICC’s website.

Staff Contact:   Megan Giblin

Director, Customs and Trade Facilitation
Tel: 202.371.9235

Megan Giblin manages USCIB’s work on customs policy, and provides support on trade and investment policy, handling issue management, policy development, and staff support for USCIB committees and working groups. Additionally, she serves as an International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) representative to the World Customs Organization’s Harmonized Systems Committee.
Read More

Related Content