International Organization of Employers (IOE)

International Organization of Employers
Location:Geneva
Founded:1920
Membership:150 national employers federations from 143 countries

Role

Represents business interests in social and labor matters at the global level, especially in the International Labor Organization, which sets international workplace standards and where employers are represented alongside trade unions and governments in a unique tripartite structure. Communicates business views on the ILO’s work, including on education and training, termination of employment, social security, health and safety, and labor standards, and represents employers within the ILO’s complaints and supervisory mechanisms. IOE also represents the views of business in the G20 process, the International Standardization Organization, the World Health Organization and the UN Human Rights Council, among other organizations.

Recent News

Diversity in the Workplace Amid Topics at Annual Engaging Business Forum (10/14/2020) - USCIB co-organized the twelfth annual Engaging Business Forum on Human Rights on October 7, however due to COVID-19 precautions, the usual two-day forum was condensed into a virtual event. Hosted by The Coca-Cola Company every year since 2008, the Forum has gathered hundreds of practitioners to discuss leading issues at the intersection of business and human rights. Despite the virtual nature of the forum, this year was no different in terms of interest and engagement by over 500 leading practitioners.
ILO Reaches Ratification on Worst Forms of Child Labor (8/19/2020) - USCIB applauds the recent universal ratification by the International Labor Organization’s (ILO) Convention on the Worst Forms of Child Labour. All 187 Member States of the ILO supported ratification. The Convention forms the basis for international action to eliminate child labor; its application assists governments globally in developing and adopting effective national laws and policies to eliminate child labor practices. The ILO works with employers, trade unions and governments globally to develop and adopt these standards as part of its unique tripartite approach to work issues.

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