Overview of the 2015 APEC Summit

AELM-family-photo-1Thousands of delegates from around the Pacific Rim gathered in the Philippines this month for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation CEO Summit, the most influential and high-level economic dialogue in the region. The summit brings together heads of state, business leaders and economic experts to share their views on how to promote free trade, innovation, growth and integration in the Asia-Pacific.

APEC leaders released two statements following the conclusion of the CEO summit: the 23rd APEC Economic Leaders’ Declaration titled “Building Inclusive Economies, Building a Better World: A Vision for an Asia-Pacific Community” and a statement supporting the multilateral trading system on the occasion of the World Trade Organization’s 20th anniversary.

Throughout the year, USCIB participated in several APEC workstreams, including efforts on chemicals, advertising and global value chains. USCIB also noted the November 19 APEC leaders’ announcement of an initiative aimed at boosting services trade among all 21 APEC economies. Leaders also reaffirmed their objective of completing the Free Trade Area of the Asia-Pacific (FTAAP). 

We are pleased to see the following items USCIB worked on were highlighted in the Ministerial statement:

Global Value Chains

The APEC Leaders’ Declaration called for the development of policies that take full advantage of global value chains (GVCs) and encourage greater participation, competition, entrepreneurship and innovation through effective and comprehensive measures, including balanced intellectual property systems and capacity-building.

In August at the third APEC Senior Officials Meeting (SOMIII), USCIB participated in a half-day trade policy dialogue titled, “APEC Best Practices to Create Jobs and Increase Competitiveness,” which convened private-sector representatives and officials from the United States and the OECD for a discussion of the impacts of forced localization policies and how best trade practices can serve as sound alternatives to these policies. APEC ministers welcomed the results of the trade policy dialogue and instructed officials to continue to identify alternatives to localization policies and develop best practices as a means to foster job creation and increase competitiveness.

The declaration also noted progress in the APEC Strategic Blueprint for Promoting Global Value Chain Development and Cooperation as a promising avenue for growth, competitiveness and job creation in the region.

Chemicals

The APEC Chemical Dialogue recently undertook research to better understand divergences in the implementation of the Globally Harmonized System for Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). APEC leaders look forward to a report from the Chemical Dialogue in 2016 on the implementation of measures to reduce these divergences, and welcomed the work of the APEC regulatory community to strengthen capacity in the scientific assessment of metals and metal compounds, as well as the work of the Chemical Dialogue on Good Regulatory Practices.

At SOMIII in August, Helen Medina, USCIB’s vice president for product policy and innovation, represented member views at several meetings of the Chemical Dialogue. USCIB also brought to the table two new ideas at the Chemical Dialogue to help bolster regulatory cooperation and streamline customs procedures in the APEC region: 1) a self-certification customs form, in which an importer of goods would self-certify that their imports comply with the U.S. Toxic Substances and Control Act, and 2) a regional capacity-building project related to the theme of  “Analogue/Read-across use in Risk Assessment.”

Advertising

APEC leaders endorsed the Principles for Government’s Role in Promoting Effective Advertising Standards and instructed officials to advance work in this area in 2016. They also encouraged continued discussions on the implementation of the APEC Action Agenda on Advertising Standards and Practices.

APEC and the Future of Asia-Pacific Trade and Economic Growth

USCIB is an outreach partner for a December 14 event hosted by the Asia Society Policy Institute in New York about the future of the Asia-Pacific region’s economic growth. Registration and the event program are available on the Asia Society’s website.

USCIB, U.S. Take Lead on Alternatives to Forced Localization at APEC

L-R: Trudy Witbreuk (OECD); Ken Schagrin (USTR) and Ed Brzytwa (ITIC)

Demonstrating thought leadership on trade facilitation and global value chains (GVCs) in the Asia-Pacific, USCIB participated in a half-day trade policy dialogue during the third Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Senior Officials Meeting (SOM III) in Cebu, the Philippines on August 28. The event titled, “APEC Best Practices to Create Jobs and Increase Competitiveness,” was organized by the APEC Committee on Trade and Investment and convened private sector representatives and officials from the United States and the OECD for a discussion of the impacts of forced localization policies and how best trade practices can serve as sound alternatives to these policies.

Helen Medina, USCIB’s vice president for product policy and innovation attended SOM III and led the session on best practices as alternatives to localization policies in the APEC region during the dialogue. USCIB members participating at the event included Jeffrey Hardee (Caterpillar), Jennifer Mulveny (Intel) and Ed Brzytwa (Information Technology Industry Council).

The event reviewed the APEC Best Practices to Create Jobs and Increase Competitiveness, which were endorsed by the APEC economies in 2013, and highlighted how those practices can be alternatives to local content requirements (LCR). Often LCRs are put in place to deal with one aspect of the economy at the expense of hurting the wider economy. Trudy Witbreuk (OECD) discussed the detrimental impacts that LCRs have had and offered other approaches for policymakers. Namely, the OECD recommends that economies to identify the domestic problem and work on a horizontal approach to resolves the issues. For example, skill shortages are best resolved through targeted training and education policies instead of local labor requirement. The OECD recommended that policies targeted at the regulatory environment, trade and investment barriers, innovation policy and infrastructure development will lead to trade outcomes that are more sustainable over the long run.

“It is not surprising that the private sector panelists echoed the OECD’s recommendation,” Medina said. The private sector participants shared their own stories about why their investments in certain APEC Economies have  flourished.  They highlighted reasons such as good investment environment, highly skilled local labor, and efficient infrastructure. The private sector also unanimously stated that the free flow of data is key to all industries.

The discussion also highlighted possible next steps that APEC can take, such as new guidance on internal coordination of regulatory work.  A summary of the meeting will be circulated to the APEC Committee on Trade and Investment so that further action items can be taken to address LCRs.  It was agreed that APEC economies have economic challenges and that what are needed are sustainable long term solutions.

USCIB and APEC economies have endeavored to make global value chains top-of-mind at APEC dialogues. At last year’s APEC CEO Summit in November, USCIB organized an event on global value chains that gave members an opportunity to discuss obstacles that APEC economies must overcome in order to leverage the benefits of GVCs as well as corresponding policy recommendations to promote economic integration within the region. You may read the outcome document of the November event online.

You may read the outcome document of the November event online.

USCIB has been advocating an APEC work stream on promoting global value chain coordination in the region, including the development of the APEC Strategic Blueprint on GVCs from the 2014 Leaders’ Declaration, which highlights how understanding global value chains is crucial for realizing a more effective policy and regulatory infrastructure for global trade. Following the blueprint, USCIB has been working with the U.S. government to address trade and investment issues that impact GVCs within APEC.

Additionally, USCIB has circulated an ICC Policy Statement on localization barriers to trade.

USCIB Promotes Regulatory Cooperation at Third APEC Senior Officials Meeting

L-R: Alexa Burr (ACC), Kate Clemans (Crowell and Moring), Christian Richter (Nickel Institute), Andrew Liu (Chemours), Derek Swick (API), Marianne Heinrich (B&P), Helen Medina (USCIB), Don Wilke (Procter & Gamble), Dusanka Sabic (Accord), Chandra Dantam (Procter & Gamble)
L-R: Alexa Burr (ACC), Kate Clemans (Crowell and Moring), Christian Richter (Nickel Institute), Andrew Liu (Chemours), Derek Swick (API), Marianne Heinrich (B&P), Helen Medina (USCIB), Don Wilke (Procter & Gamble), Dusanka Sabic (Accord), Chandra Dantam (Procter & Gamble)

Central to the modern economy, chemicals and products they are used in are traded widely across borders. Because they add value to so many different consumer goods, chemicals are a staple economic building block for the member countries of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum.

Regulatory cooperation and good regulatory practices was the focus of this year’s third APEC Senior Officials Meeting (SOM III) hosted in the Philippines. Trade officials, regulators and industry representatives from the APEC region met for 3 days to share information, discuss various challenges facing the chemicals industry and agree on action items to address issues of mutual concern.

Helen Medina, USCIB’s vice president for product policy and innovation, attended SOM III from August 25-29, representing USCIB member views at several important meetings, including the APEC regulators forum, the Chemical Dialogue and a workshop on good regulatory practices.

In addition to Medina, other USCIB members attending those meetings included representatives from the American Chemistry Council, Boeing, American Petroleum Institute, British Petroleum, Chemours, Crowell & Moring, Nickel Institute, P&G and the Society of Chemical Manufactures and Affiliates.

Participants at these meetings agreed to work on the following items:

  • A checklist to promote implementation of the Chemical Dialogue Best Practice Principles
  • Outreach to the APEC Economic Committee for further cooperation, including proposing a potential chemical-specific panel during the EC’s Good Regulatory Practice, which will take place in Peru in 2016.
  • A new document outlining the Chemical Industry Priorities for the Negotiation of Regional and Bilateral Free Trade Agreements
  • A new Capacity Building Workshop related to Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals

15th-CHEMICAL-DIALOGUEAt the APEC Chemical Dialogue, USCIB also brought to the table two new ideas to help bolster regulatory cooperation and streamline customs procedures in the APEC region: 1) a self-certification customs form, in which an importer of goods would self-certify that their imports comply, and 2) a regional capacity-building project related to the theme of  “Analogue/Read-across use in Risk Assessment.”

 

Inclusive Growth in Asia-Pacific: USCIB Rolls Out 2015 APEC Agenda

4942_image002The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum is the most influential high-level dialogue in the region. APEC convenes heads of state, business leaders and economic experts from 21 Pacific-Rim economies to share their views on how to promote free trade, innovation, growth and integration in the region.

The Philippines is the 2015 host economy, and it has organized APEC’s three Senior Officials’ Meetings and the APEC CEO Summit around the theme of “Building Inclusive Economies, Building a Better World.”

USCIB will be representing American business interests at the APEC meetings throughout the year. With our global network that includes the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the International Organization of Employers (IOE), and our membership in the U.S.-APEC Business Coalition, USCIB is uniquely positioned to give its members access to the policy dialogues taking place in one of the most dynamic regions of the world.

USCIB issued its “2015 APEC Priority Issues and Recommendations” in November outlining our longstanding and overarching objectives of promoting open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility. Covering a wide range of issues from chemical regulations to trade facilitation to women in the economy, USCIB will work to advance our APEC priorities throughout the Philippines host year.

USCIB Participation in APEC

SOM1 – Clark, Philippines

USCIB members will travel to Clark to attend the APEC Chemical Dialogue (CD), a forum for regulatory officials and industry representatives seeking to advance regulatory dialogue on the chemicals trade and achieve environmental protection while minimizing costs to business. Helen Medina, USCIB’s senior director for product policy and innovation, was scheduled to attend the summit but was unable to due to inclement weather in New York. She will attend the CD during SOM3, and will continue to review APEC’s ongoing efforts to promote regulatory cooperation in the APEC economies.

SOM2 and Meeting of the Ministers Responsible for Trade – Boracay, Philippines

USCIB is advancing work on global value chains within the Asia-Pacific, working with Ed Brzytwa, director for APEC affairs at the office of the United States Trade Representative, in supporting the U.S. government’s efforts to address barriers to trade and investment.

USCIB is also coordinating with ICC to issue a statement on localization barriers to trade urging APEC economies to adopt alternative policies that will enhance their competitiveness and attract foreign direct investment.

SOM3 – Cebu, Philippines

Kristin Isabelli, USCIB’s director of customs and trade facilitation, will attend a the meeting of the APEC Sub-Committee on Customs Procedures to share the private sector’s vision on the benefits of implementing guidelines that would streamline cross-border trade among APEC economies. Isabelli is also the private sector chair of the APEC Virtual Customs Business Working Group.

CEO Summit – Manila, Philippines

This is the fifth year that USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson will attend the APEC CEO Summit. USCIB will join business representatives from around the world to participate in bilateral meetings with senior officials from APEC economies to relay USCIB’s top priorities and coordinate across industries, sectors and borders.

Key 2015 APEC Events

  • SOM I – Jan  26-Feb 7 (Clark)
  • SOM II – May 10-21 (Boracay)
  • SOM III – Aug 24-Sept 8 (Cebu)
  • Women in the Economy Summit – Sept 16-18 (Manila)
  • Energy Ministerial and Private Sector Dialogue on Energy – Oct 12-14 (Cebu)
  • CEO Summit – Nov 15-17 (Manila)
  • APEC Leaders Meeting – Nov 17-18 (Manila)

USCIB Gears Up for APEC Summit With Business Priorities

More: Boost for APEC Agenda on Marketing

The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) is a forum comprised of 21 Pacific Rim member economies that promotes free trade and economic cooperation throughout the Asia-Pacific region. In the lead-up to APEC’s November meetings in Beijing, which will close out China’s host year, USCIB welcomes the committed partnerships that APEC sustained with the private sector to address the region’s complex economic challenges.
The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) is a forum comprised of 21 Pacific Rim member economies that promotes free trade and economic cooperation throughout the Asia-Pacific region. In the lead-up to APEC’s November meetings in Beijing, which will close out China’s host year, USCIB welcomes the committed partnerships that APEC sustained with the private sector to address the region’s complex economic challenges.

The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) is a forum comprised of 21 Pacific Rim member economies that promotes free trade and economic cooperation throughout the Asia-Pacific region. In the lead-up to APEC’s November meetings in Beijing, which will close out China’s host year, USCIB welcomes the committed partnerships that APEC sustained with the private sector to address the region’s complex economic challenges.

Throughout 2014, USCIB advanced a wide range of policy discussions through APEC to promote a pro-business agenda on chemicals regulation, advertising self-regulation, data privacy, customs, women in the economy and local content requirements.

USCIB engaged in several APEC working groups, including the Chemical Dialogue, Customs Business Dialogue and the Electronic Commerce Steering Group, to encourage discussions between governments and the private sector on topics of interest to business.

Next week, USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson will attend the APEC CEO Summit in Beijing, China from November 8 to 10 as a business delegate and representative of the U.S. APEC Business Coalition along with Helen Medina, USCIB senior director of product policy and innovation, and USCIB member company CEOs and executives. Robinson and Medina will discuss USCIB’s work and members’ APEC priorities, and will join with other coalition partners to pursue common business objectives.

The APEC forum is a valuable space for business to engage with the region’s political leaders, and USCIB has assumed a leadership role in APEC on behalf of our members. At the CEO Summit this year, USCIB will organize a breakfast event on November 10 through the U.S. APEC Business Coalition to discuss the role of global value chains (GVCs) in strengthening economic integration across Pacific Rim countries. The event will feature private sector representatives and APEC government officials who will offer their perspectives on how policies and regulations impact investment decisions, supply-chain routing, cost efficiency, and key ingredients for climbing the GVC-ladder. Please find the current draft agenda here.

USCIB has also consulted with members engaged in APEC’s work to develop top-level messaging for the CEO Summit and related meetings in Beijing, as well as an APEC priorities document ahead of the 2015 APEC Summit to be hosted by the Philippines.

On October 14, the USCIB APEC Working Group met with Ed Brzytwa, Director for APEC Affairs, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) and Bob Wang, U.S. Senior Official for APEC, U.S. Department of State, where members voiced their thoughts on priority areas including:

  • the integration of global value chains throughout the APEC region;
  • the importance of digital trade in economic development and issues regarding local content;
  • alignment to international best practices in advertising and the promotion of self-regulatory bodies (see below);
  • intellectual property rights enforcement and capacity building;
  • rule of law and ethical business practices in supply chains (child labor and human trafficking); and
  • the importance of energy security and strategic infrastructure to sustainable development.

Additionally, USCIB plans to meet with Deputy Secretary of Commerce Bruce Andrews to discuss USCIB’s APEC work and priorities.

More information on USCIB’s APEC activities will be available after the summit concludes next week.

Staff contact: Rachel Spence and Helen Medina
More on USCIB’s APEC Working Group

Boost for APEC Agenda on Marketing

Earlier this month, USCIB and the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) convened a well-attended roundtable in Washington, DC, on moving forward with the promotion of marketing and advertising standards work in APEC. There are strong signals that the Chinese government (this year’s APEC host) is pushing for leaders at the November APEC summit in Beijing to endorse the APEC action agenda on advertising standards, which was agreed by ministers at the August senior officials meeting.

Among other things, the action agenda calls for APEC economies to develop principles to use in constructing their ad standards regimes, as well as an advertising regulatory checklist of key elements in a regulatory (including self-regulatory) framework. USCIB and GMA members discussed with U.S. government representatives what industry would like to see next. They agreed to send a letter to U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman laying out the case for additional APEC work in this area in order to facilitate cross-border trade and investment in the APEC region.

Staff contact: Jonathan Huneke

More on USCIB’s Marketing and Advertising Committee

Trade Facilitation in Asia

Kristin Isabelli (far right) moderated a workshop on chokepoint 8 titled “Lack of Regional Cross-Border Customs-Transit Arrangements.”
Kristin Isabelli (far right) moderated a workshop on chokepoint 8 titled “Lack of Regional Cross-Border Customs-Transit Arrangements.”

Government and private-sector representatives convened in Beijing for the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Senior Officials’ Meetings throughout August to discuss how to support sustainable economic growth and prosperity in the Asia-Pacific region.

USCIB participated in a number of meetings regarding customs matters. Kristin Isabelli, director of Customs and Trade Facilitation, moderated a workshop on chokepoint 8 and the private sector’s vision on the benefits of implementing proposed guidelines that would streamline cross-border trade among APEC economies. USCIB also participated in meetings that allowed business to weigh in on APEC chemicals regulation.

Chokepoint 8 addresses the lack of the lack of regional, cross-border customs transit arrangements between third party non-APEC countries. When goods transit through third party countries as they travel from one APEC country to another, there is currently no way to track the goods. Each country requires different documentation for the goods in transit, which makes moving goods more time-consuming and expensive for business. The goal of the proposed chokepoint 8 guidelines is to streamline and harmonize the required documentation, promote harmonized border transit agreements among economies and eliminate the need to undergo customs for cross border customs transit.

Isabelli’s panel addressed the lack of transit arrangements and customs harmonization in the APEC region and allowed the private sector to discuss some of the infrastructural, logistic, technological and capacity-building issues that hamper the smooth flow of goods and services between APEC economies. Businesses support the establishment of regional cross-border transit arrangements that would slash red tape at customs, enhancing efficiency throughout the supply chain and facilitating trade and economic growth. Securing such agreements requires the collaboration of all APEC economies.

This year’s third APEC Senior Officials Meetings also marked the first meeting of the customs public private sector virtual working group, of which Isabelli is the private sector co-chair. The meeting convened members of the business community, including Ralph Carter (FedEx), and customs officials to discuss a list of priorities that would complement the work of the APEC Subcommittee on Customs Procedures (SCCP), including e-commerce, single window – a system whereby traders can submit regulatory documents to a single location –and trusted trader programs. The subcommittee’s objectives are to simplify and harmonize regional customs procedures to ensure that goods and services move efficiently and safely through the region.

Staff contact: Kristin Isabelli

More on USCIB’s Customs and Trade Facilitation Committee

More on USCIB’s APEC Working Group

Chemicals Regulation Top-of-Mind at APEC Senior Officials Meeting

LR: Hitoshi Nanimoto (Japan), Dusanka Sabic (Australia), Andy Liu (DuPont), Erica Logan (ITIC), Sophia Danenburg (Boeing)
LR: Hitoshi Nanimoto (Japan), Dusanka Sabic (Australia), Andy Liu (DuPont), Erica Logan (ITIC), Sophia Danenburg (Boeing)

The chemicals trade cuts across multiple industries and contributes to the production of thousands of different products, from pharmaceuticals to computer microchips. Central to the modern economy, chemicals and products they are used in are traded widely across borders. And because they add value to so many different consumer goods, chemicals are a staple economic building block for the member countries of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum.

The regulation of chemicals trade was top-of-mind during this year’s third APEC Senior Officials Meeting (SOM III) hosted in China, where government regulators met with industry representatives and other stakeholders to discuss opportunities and challenges in the chemicals industry.

Helen Medina, USCIB’s senior director of product policy and innovation, attended SOM III along with a number of member company executives. The meetings took place under the auspices of the APEC Chemical Dialogue, a forum for regulatory officials and industry representatives seeking to advance regulatory dialogue on chemicals trade and achieve environmental protection while minimizing costs to business.

During an industry “pre-meeting,” private-sector representative from the APEC region met to discuss business priorities on chemicals regulation. Of concern to industry included ongoing issues related to EU REACH, such matters related to polymers and the criteria for identifying endocrine disruptors. The APEC region is also increasingly a concern for industry given all the changes in the chemical management systems in China, Korea and Chinese Taipei. Industry is concerned about Confidential Business Information (CBI), and is keen on protecting trade secrets. Business supports striking the right balance between health safety and the protection of intellectual property rights, and to that end industry is backing the implementation of the 2008 Best Practice Principles on chemicals regulation in the APEC economies.

USCIB also convened an industry meeting with officials from the U.S. State Department and USTR. The meeting provided an opportunity for business to show that a wide range of industry sectors are involved in the APEC Chemical Dialogue – companies represented at the meeting included DuPont, American Petroleum Institute, Boeing, the Information Technology Industry Council, the American Chemistry Council, the Nickel Institute and others. The meeting also gave industry a chance to discuss priority issues such as regulatory cooperation and CBI. Industry also noted that chemical regulations shouldn’t disrupt the availability of certain irreplaceable chemicals needed for specialized industries.

Joint Meeting of APEC Regulators’ Forum and OECD New Chemicals Clearing House

USCIB’s Medina also participated in the joint meeting of the APEC Regulators’ Forum with the OECD Clearing House on New Chemicals, which brings together officials from the U.S., Canada and Australia and industry representatives to craft ways to reduce the costs on business associated with new chemical notification reviews while ensuring a high quality of health and safety decisions for new chemicals.

APEC economies provided updates on their chemical management systems, with OECD countries sharing best practices to help developing countries build up their chemical management systems. For example, New Zealand developed a toolbox to help small businesses deal with hazardous substances, and the United States spoke about Environmentally Preferable Purchasing, a program that allows the federal government to buy green products, stimulating market demand for environmentally friendly products and services. The OECD also presented its work on a toolbox that supports the evaluation of alternatives when safer chemical substitutes are sought.

The Regulators’ Forum gives business the opportunity to obtain an overview of the chemical management systems in the APEC economies and how planned changes could impact business. It also gives industry a chance to interact with regulators, as well as learn about what chemicals programs advanced economies are promoting.

Serving as a place where governments can share information about new chemicals going to market, the Clearing House is beneficial to business because companies don’t have to regenerate information about new chemicals. Instead, companies go to one place – the OECD Clearing House – for chemicals evaluation, and then put those chemicals on the market in different countries.

The Clearing House is actively working to include more participants from non-OECD countries in its activities. Since many APEC economies are in the process of updating or creating new chemical management systems, APEC regulators have much to gain from discussions with the OECD Clearing House.

“Our hope is that both APEC economies and industry see the value of the OECD Clearing House on New Chemicals,” Medina said.

Workshop Advances Best Practices on Chemicals Regulation

On Tuesday USCIB’s Medina attended the APEC Chemical Dialogue Regulatory Cooperation Workshop. The purpose of the workshop is to advance the implementation of the 2008 Principles for Best Practice Chemical Regulation and to contribute to APEC’s ongoing efforts to promote regulatory cooperation. USCIB members featured prominently on the agenda and were able to communicate their specific perspectives on why regulatory cooperation is important.

Andy Liu of DuPont gave one industry’s view on the importance of having risk based decision making practices. “We believe risk-based assessments and oversight of chemicals most effectively protect the public and the environment,” said Liu. “Proportionality of oversight and efficient use of available resources by screening, prioritizing, and only generating data that are necessary for decision-making can help stakeholders to minimize risk of chemicals and allow investment in innovations necessary for a brighter future.”

Liu also highlighted the importance of protecting confidential business information so that companies can continue to innovate and bring sustainable solutions to society. While implementing the Globally Harmonized hazards classification and labeling systems in a more consistent manner would lessen the costs to the business.

Participants also heard from Erica Logan, ITIC whose main message was that the electronics industry is leveraging an internationally recognized International Electrotechnical Commission standard to manage relevant Chemicals in Products information throughout the supply chain. “We encourage governments to recognize the value of such standardized approaches for managing chemical information and risk,” said Logan.

Sophia Danenberg of Boeing gave another downstream users perspective. She noted that chemical management systems do impact the aerospace industry and that regulators should consider how chemical regulations impact the availability of high specialized chemicals for use in the aerospace industry.

On a related note, Don Wilke, P&G, talked about principles for substance evaluation and the benefits for having a regulatory framework that allows or encourages the use of analogues and other surrogate data in chemical assessments. Use of analogues reduces animal use, costs and can provide for higher tier information sooner.

“The appropriate use of chemical analogues and read-across information can significantly reduce the unnecessary use of animals in safety testing as well as reduce the costs and the time required for testing,” said Wilke. “This is in line with the Chemical Dialogue Best Practice Principles of efficiency, flexibility and science-based decision making.”

More information about the workshop and its conclusions are forthcoming.

Staff contact: Helen Medina

More on USCIB’s APEC Working Group

More on USCIB’s Product Policy Working Group

APEC Leaders Identify Development of Regional Advertising Standards as 2014 Priority

4654_image001Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) leaders recently endorsed development work on best practice standards for regulating advertising at their ministerial meeting in Bali.

USCIB and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) are actively supporting this process, and welcomed the endorsement as a step forward validating previous work in this area to establish greater consistency in the rules and application of advertising frameworks in the region. This move will enable the recommendations of the November 2012 Hanoi Dialogue on Advertising Standards and Principles and Practice to be implemented.

USCIB and ICC are working with the Advertising Standards Bureau Australia (ASBA), the European Advertising Standards Alliance, the World Federation of Advertisers and other partners to establish consistency based on international best practice frameworks and encourage greater capacity for economies wishing to build an effective advertising self-regulatory system.

The Consolidated ICC Code of Advertising and Marketing Practice, developed by the ICC Commission on Marketing and Advertising, serves as a foundation for self-regulatory structures around the world. It offers a baseline for APEC economies developing advertising principles while also providing flexibility for local laws and culture to be reflected in a national code.

“Common principles and advertising standards have wisely been recognized as a worthwhile pursuit by APEC economies,” said ICC Commission Chair Brent Sanders, assistant general counsel with Microsoft, who also chairs USCIB’s Marketing and Advertising Committee. “They offer the benefit of reducing trade barriers while offering an effective means to foster corporate responsibility and consumer trust. Alignment with international standards will help position advertising to serve effectively and responsibly as a valuable engine of economic growth across the region.”

Read more on ICC’s website.

The new work stream in APEC will be a focus of discussion when the ICC commission meets in Paris on January 25. Earlier this month, members of USCIB’s committee held a conference call to discuss preparations for the Paris meeting, which will also review developments in developing an ICC framework for alcohol marketing, new work on digital advertising, and a number of other issues.

Staff contacts: Jonathan Huneke

More on USCIB’s Marketing and Advertising Committee

Business Urges APEC to Take Concrete Steps to Expedite Trade

4607_image002New York, N.Y., October 2, 2013 – As leaders of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies get set to meet in Bali, Indonesia, a key pro-trade business group urged a number of concrete steps to free up trade and facilitate business in this fast-growing region.

The United States Council for International Business (USCIB) issued a comprehensive paper with priority issues and recommendations for APEC in 2014, when the group’s rotating host duties pass to China.

“APEC’s importance for U.S. and global business is growing,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson, who will be part of the business delegation to the Bali summit, which takes place October 5 to 7. “We are recommending a number of steps leaders can take to help ensure the region remains a center for growth and innovation.”

USCIB said several current or prospective APEC projects offer special promise to smooth trade relations among the economies. These include:

  • the APEC Chemical Dialogue, which USCIB called a useful and important forum to address issues relating to chemicals management
  • discussion of long-term climate change adaptation planning, where USCIB is seeking to inject private-sector know-how
  • launch of the Virtual Customs Business Dialogue, which will look at reducing technical and administrative barriers to trade, during China’s host year

The business group is also urging APEC’s 21 member economies to undertake new work to address localization barriers to trade, and to work toward the elimination of barriers to trade in digital services and products. The USCIB paper, which is issued annually, covers more than 20 separate issue areas. USCIB said its member companies would be closely engaged throughout China’s host year.

Robinson said the business community would push for progress on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) when trade ministers from the 12 TPP parties meet on the sidelines of the Bali summit. “We want a strong, comprehensive TPP agreement, with no carve-outs of issues or sectors, and which includes key provisions on forced localization and dispute settlement,” he stated.

Looking at the global trading system, Robinson said business would also encourage APEC members to work together in the World Trade Organization (WTO) to open global markets to trade, especially through a potential trade facilitation agreement that will be on the table at the WTO’s own Bali ministerial in December.

 

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world. With a unique global network encompassing leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043, jhuneke@uscib.org

APEC Members Look at Advertising Standards

4472_image002Prior to the February meeting in Indonesia of the APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) Committee on Trade and Investment, each of the lead representatives of the 21 member economies were urged by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), part of USCIB’s global network, to support work advancing advertising standards in the region.

USCIB is working with ICC and a range of U.S. business groups to present business views to APEC member economies throughout Indonesia’s host year.

ICC, a leading proponent of self-regulation in many spheres, maintains a highly regarded code on marketing and advertising, which is used as a model by self-regulatory authorities around the world. In a letter, ICC Secretary General Jean-Guy Carrier expressed global business support and ICC endorsement of an Australian-led initiative to develop common principles for advertising standards across APEC economies, with the aim of reducing technical trade barriers.

eferring to a report from a November 2012 dialogue in Vietnam, where government and industry participants issued recommendations, Carrier highlighted the importance of APEC support and follow-up on capacity building proposals to help economies getting started or wishing to further develop national standards to the ICC Code and the best practice model recommendations for self-regulation. Read more on ICC’s website.

On February 19, USCIB’s Marketing and Advertising Committee organized a call with the U.S. Trade Representative’s office and the ICC Marketing Commission to discuss self-regulation in advertising in the APEC area, and the possibility for capacity-building within APEC to promote effective self-regulation of advertising. Outcomes of the call included exploring a possible workshop on self-regulation during the Indonesia APEC year and reporting out to senior APEC officials on the ICC’s code.

Staff contact: Justine Badimon and Charlene Flick