USCIB-US Chamber WCO E-Commerce Industry Day

USCIB and the U.S. Chamber will hold a World Customs Organization (WCO) E-Commerce Industry Day meetings with U.S. government inter-agency partners.

Tuesday, May 21, 3:00-5:00 pm

Hosted by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Washington, DC

If you are interested in attending, please contact Ashley Harrington: aharrington@uscib.org.

World Trade Week: International Trade Awards Breakfast

The International Trade Awards Breakfast offers a unique chance to recognize the achievements of practitioners in field and facilitate the promotion of small businesses around the world. This event recognizes the importance of international trade to the growth of the region’s economy and celebrates the companies and organizations that contribute to it. Attendees will have the opportunity to network and learn of the global initiatives and resources available in the New York metro area. U.S. Department of Commerce Under Secretary for International Trade Gilbert Kaplan speak and present Department of Commerce export awards at the breakfast.

Register Now

https://www.worldtradeweeknyc.org/

Date

Monday, May 13, 2019

8:30 AM – 11:00AM

Location

Baruch College

55 Lexington Avenue (24th Street and Lexington Avenue) New York City

 

 

 

Nobody Wins in Escalation of U.S.-China Trade Fight, Says USCIB

Washington, D.C., May 8, 2019 – The United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most successful global companies, appealed to the United States and China to ratchet down their trade fight in the wake of President Trump‘s decision to increase duties on some $200 billion of Chinese exports from 10 percent to 25 percent.

“When the U.S. and China fight, nobody wins, as the past year’s market gyrations, lost deals, and strained diplomatic ties have made abundantly clear,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson. “American business continues to have major problems with China’s commercial policies, but we simply must find a way to tackle these that doesn’t turn our most competitive companies into collateral damage.”

Robinson continued: “The earlier rounds of tariffs, coupled with China’s retaliatory measures, are already a significant strain on U.S. consumers, and on the economy as a whole. This latest U.S. escalation, and the inevitable Chinese response will impose considerable additional strains on our exporters and on companies, workers and communities that rely on international trade to succeed.”

Robinson urged the Trump administration to work more closely with key U.S. trading partners and with the business community to address serious Chinese trade abuses, including referring U.S. complaints to the World Trade Organization.

“The U.S. has won some important victories, including against discriminatory Chinese practices and policies, in the WTO lately,” he noted. “We should use the multilateral platform as it was intended to be used, to defuse escalating trade tensions, and to end the uncertainty that is rattling markets and fraying the nerves of both business owners and consumers.”

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of several leading international business organizations, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More information is available at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
jhuneke@uscib.org, +1 212.703.5043

Giblin Promotes Value of ATA Carnet System in Colombia

Megan Giblin

USCIB Director for Customs and Trade Facilitation Megan Giblin traveled to Colombia April 23-25 to attend and present on the ATA Carnet System as part of a broader “Trade Facilitation: Opportunities for Global Economy” forum that was co-hosted by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Colombia, the Bogota Chamber of Commerce, and the Global Alliance for Trade Facilitation.

ATA Carnets are international customs documents that allow for duty-free and tax-free temporary import of goods for up to one year and are important tools for international trade facilitation. In addition to its affiliate role of ICC, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD, USCIB is the National Guaranteeing Association (NGA) for ATA Carnet. As the NGA, USCIB operates and manages the ATA Carnet system in the United States.

The event was primarily focused on the World Trade Organization (WTO) Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA) and its implementation in Colombia through Global Alliance for Trade Facilitation funded projects. In addition, there was a panel on the ATA Carnet System, “ATA Carnet as a Mechanism for Global Commerce.” Giblin linked the temporary admissions provisions of the WTO TFA, which does not specify how they should be implemented, to the global gold standard or global best practice for temporary admissions, the ATA System.

At the event, Giblin, presenting in Spanish, focused on the basics of the ATA System, educating the audience, which consisted of Colombian exporters, on the ATA System and its benefits. Representatives from Colombia Customs (DIAN), the World Customs Organization (WCO), the Colombian audiovisual sector and the ICC Colombia Commission on Customs and Trade Facilitation joined Giblin on the panel to provide additional value add of the ATA System.

“In efforts to encourage TFA plus implementation, we recommend Colombia become a contacting party to the WCO Istanbul Convention with broadest scope of coverage and promptly implement the System, which USCIB has been promoting in Latin America alongside ICC WCF,” said Giblin. “We look forward to working with ICC Colombia and the Colombian government, especially Customs, to promote the ATA System and provide support and guidance as questions, clarifications, or other obstacles related to full adoption arise.”

Business Not Bullish on Prospect of New China Tariffs

USCIB joined other members of the American for Free Trade coalition to issue a statement to President Trump in response to his announcement on May 3 to increase the China tariffs from 10 to 25 percent, representing a tariff total of $200 billion.

The statement highlighted key figures that indicated the enormous consequences the tariffs would have on the U.S. economy and consumers. According to the statement, not only would this increase result in a loss of nearly one million jobs, but current tariffs already burden consumers with $69 billion in added costs.

“For ten months, Americans have been paying the full cost of the trade war, not China,” read the statement, which referred to the 10 percent of tariffs imposed earlier this year. “To be clear, tariffs are taxes that Americans pay, and this sudden increase with little notice will only punish U.S. farmers, businesses and consumers.”

Eva Hampl, who leads USCIB’s work on China also emphasized: “The tariffs currently imposed on Chinese imports are already a significant strain on the U.S. economy and consumers. An increase on such a broad cross section of industries will exacerbate the negative effects to a degree that will be a significant challenge for companies.”

USCIB Joins Coalition in Urging Specific US Government Action on US-China Trade

USCIB joined Americans for Free Trade, a multi-industry coalition consisting of over 150 members, to send a letter to President Donald Trump on April 22 regarding upcoming U.S.-China trade talks.

The Coalition letter urged the U.S. government to fully and immediately remove all recently imposed tariffs, including U.S. tariffs and China’s retaliatory tariffs as part of a final deal, while also encouraging the U.S. to come up with a deal that levels the playing field for U.S. companies by achieving meaningful changes to address China’s unfair trade practices that put American technology, innovation and intellectual property at risk.

Regarding unfair trade practices, the letter stated: “For too long, China has engaged in unfair trading practices, including forced technology transfer, cyber theft, intellectual property violations and more. We hope any final deal will resolve the structural issues that are at the core of the trade dispute in order to fully protect American technology, innovation, and intellectual property.”

The letter also urged the government to avoid any enforcement mechanism that would trigger further tariffs and obtain clarity on how the tariff exemption process will be carried out in the event of a deal.

Finally, the group also urged an economic assessment by the Administration examining the costs of tariffs for American businesses and consumers.

Americans for Free Trade represents companies that employ tens of millions of American workers and provide goods and services to virtually every corner of the United States.

APEC Workshop Emphasizes Crucial Role of Business

L-R: Matías Pinto Pimente (Embassy of Chile), Monica Hardy Whaley (NCAPEC) at APEC Essentials Workshop

USCIB partnered with the National Center for APEC (NCAPEC) and C&M International to host an APEC Essentials workshop on March 27 to help participants understand the fundamentals of APEC including its history, objectives and opportunities. The event, which attracted approximately 80 attendees, featured practical case studies led by industry discussants on how several sectors approach priority issues and leverage the APEC platform.

Private sector participation in APEC is organized under the leadership of the NCAPEC, which serves as the designated 2019 U.S. Strategic Partner for the CEO Summit, Secretariat to the U.S. members of the APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC) and as Chair and Secretariat of the U.S. APEC Business Coalition.

USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson makes remarks at the APEC Essentials Workshop

“APEC is an incubator where economies and business can come together in a non-competitive, mutually supportive way,” said USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson, who gave welcoming remarks and moderated one of the panels. “APEC member economies do not need to worry about binding treaties but indirectly they can influence what’s going on in the world, such as in customs and trade and environmental goods. APEC sets an example. Too many international organizations are shutting out the private sector. APEC welcomes the private sector and other stakeholders and that’s one of the reasons it gets things done.”

USCIB addressed a number of issues through APEC to advance discussions across a range of issues including chemicals regulation, advertising self-regulation, data privacy, customs and digital trade. USCIB members and staff have engaged in several APEC working groups, including the Chemical Dialogue, APEC Business-Customs Dialogue, Customs Procedures Virtual Working Group, Alliance for Supply Chain Connectivity, the Electronic Commerce Steering Group and Data Privacy Subgroup.

USCIB’s Customs and Trade Facilitation lead Megan Giblin, alongside Customs colleagues

The program featured Matías Pinto Pimente, head of the economic department and trade commissioner at the Embassy of Chile in Washington DC; Emily Fischer, principal APEC coordinator, economic policy advisor, U.S. Department of State; Jillian DeLuna, director for APEC affairs, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative; Monica Hardy Whaley, president, National Center for APEC; and Ambassador Robert Holleyman, president and chief executive, Crowell & Moring International; Partner, Crowell & Moring; former Deputy U.S. Trade Representative.

Chile will host this year’s APEC meetings.

USCIB Members Visit National IPR Center to Discuss Anti-Illicit Trade

The National Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center (National IPR Center) hosted USCIB members from the Anti-Illicit Trade (AIT), Customs and Trade Facilitation, and the Intellectual Property and Innovation Committees on March 12 to discuss intellectual property issues related to trade. Twenty-four participants ranging from USCIB members and staff to representatives from multiple U.S. government agencies (e.g., DHS, HSI, DOJ, FBI) and other government agencies (e.g., Mexico SAT) attended the meeting.

The National IPR Center National Program Manager, Charles Jackson, led an in-depth briefing on the approaches the IPR Center is taking to fight illicit trade, counterfeit and pirated goods and all related crimes. Through a wide spread global footprint, the IPR center is able to facilitate specific operations to focus on their three primary areas of concern: public health and safety, warfighters and the U.S. economy. Operation Chain Reaction and Operation Ingenuity are just two examples of projects that are utilized to target counterfeit items entering the U.S. military and automotive industry supply chains. The IPR Center applauded USCIB for establishing the new AIT Committee and its leadership in the OECD Task Force on Countering Illicit Trade.

The meeting provided a unique opportunity for USCIB to review the AIT Committee priorities and plan of action, and members to learn about the work of the National IPR Center and specific areas of focus, express views, voice concerns, as well as express interest in including cross-sectoral cooperation and information-sharing going forward.

“This is another step in strengthening public-private partnerships across sectors and promote engagement for future projects on this crucial issue,” noted Director for Customs and Trade Facilitation Megan Giblin.

USCIB Lays Out Priorities for WTO Modernization

Washington, D.C., March 13, 2019 – Responding to this week’s hearing in the Senate Finance Committee on the future of the World Trade Organization, the United States Council for International Business (USCIB), which represents America’s most successful global companies, has submitted a business roadmap for the WTO laying out priorities for the organization’s modernization.

“The continued existence and effectiveness of the WTO is vital to U.S. business,” stated USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson and USCIB Trade and Investment Committee Chair Charles R. Johnston in their transmittal letter.

“The WTO is a cornerstone of the global rules-based trading system and has helped spread growth and development for decades. The WTO’s existing agreements, such as those on intellectual property rights, sanitary and phytosanitary measures, and technical barriers to trade, provide practical commercial benefits for business because they establish global frameworks of rules designed to facilitate international trade.”

USCIB’s roadmap focuses on addressing subsidies and other market-distorting support provided to state-owned enterprises, the establishment of new rules for current issues such as digital trade and customs processes on electronic transmissions, and ensuring a properly functioning appellate body, among other issues.

The statement notes that the U.S. has been a major beneficiary of the WTO’s dispute settlement system, bringing and winning more cases than any other WTO member. “In fact, the U.S. has prevailed in over 90% of the complaints it filed,” USCIB observed.

USCIB urged WTO members to actively solicit the views of the business community, which undertakes the vast majority of cross-border trade and investment that is impacted by WTO rules. “The private sector has a direct stake in the rules that will be the outcome of the government-to-government discussions and, accordingly, private sector comments and recommendations should be actively solicited and given careful consideration,” the statement said.

About USCIB:
USCIB promotes open markets, competitiveness and innovation, sustainable development and corporate responsibility, supported by international engagement and regulatory coherence. Its members include U.S.-based global companies and professional services firms from every sector of our economy, with operations in every region of the world, generating $5 trillion in annual revenues and employing over 11 million people worldwide. As the U.S. affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Organization of Employers and Business at OECD, USCIB provides business views to policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide, and works to facilitate international trade and investment. More at www.uscib.org.

Contact:
Jonathan Huneke, USCIB
+1 212.703.5043, jhuneke@uscib.org

 

USCIB to Hold Meeting on APEC Essentials

You have heard about the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation regional forum, also known as APEC, but you are not entirely sure of the format, or how your company or business association would benefit from participation.  Here is a rare opportunity to have all of your APEC questions answered, and to bring you up to speed on recent developments at the most recent Senior Officials’ Meeting under this year’s leadership of Chile.

On March 27, USCIB will join with the National Center for APEC (NCAPEC) and C&M International to host APEC Essentials, a workshop to help participants understand the fundamentals of APEC including its history, objectives and opportunities. Learn from practical case studies led by industry discussants on how several sectors approach priority issues and leverage the APEC platform.

Besides USCIB President and CEO Peter Robinson, the program will also feature His Excellency Alfonso Silva Navarro, ambassador of Chile to the United States; Emily Fischer, principal APEC coordinator, economic policy advisor, U.S. Department of State; Jillian DeLuna, director for APEC affairs, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative; Monica Hardy Whaley, president, National Center for APEC; and Ambassador Robert Holleyman, president and chief executive, Crowell & Moring International; Partner, Crowell & Moring; former Deputy U.S. Trade Representative.

Private sector participation in APEC is organized under the leadership of the NCAPEC, which serves as the designated 2019 U.S. Strategic Partner for the CEO Summit, Secretariat to the U.S. members of the APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC) and as Chair and Secretariat of the U.S. APEC Business Coalition.

USCIB joined with ABAC and APEC Business Coalition partners to advance common objectives during last year’s APEC leadership by Papua New Guinea. Throughout 2018, USCIB addressed a number of issues through APEC to advance discussions across a range of issue. These include chemicals regulation, advertising self-regulation, data privacy, customs, and digital trade. USCIB members and staff have engaged in several APEC working groups, including the Chemical Dialogue, APEC Business-Customs Dialogue, Customs Procedures Virtual Working Group, Alliance for Supply Chain Connectivity, the Electronic Commerce Steering Group and Data Privacy Subgroup.

“USCIB looks forward to the APEC Essentials workshop and we thank Crowell & Moring for hosting this event,” said Vice President of Product Policy and Innovation Mike Michener, who leads USCIB’s work on APEC.  “USCIB appreciates the numerous committed partnerships that APEC has established with the private sector.  These partnerships are addressing many economic opportunities, particularly on trade and regulatory issues, that will help foster greater economic integration among APEC’s twenty-one member economies.”