USCIB Contributes Comments to UN on Digital Cooperation

USCIB filed comments to the office of the United Nations Secretary General to identify good examples and propose modalities for working cooperatively across sectors, disciplines and borders to address challenges in the digital age.
USCIB’s comments noted that stakeholder inclusion can lower the risk of unintended consequences and increase legitimacy and adoption of policies.

 

USCIB filed comments to the office of the United Nations Secretary General on November 28 in his request for public comments “to identify good examples and propose modalities for working cooperatively across sectors, disciplines and borders to address challenges in the digital age.” The comments will be presented to the High-Level Panel on Digital Cooperation, which was established by the UN Secretary General in July 2018. The Panel will seek to conduct a broad engagement and consultation process, resulting in a final report with actionable recommendations in 2019.

To inform the HLPDC deliberations, the Secretariat launched a wide-ranging consultation process to gather the views of governments, the private sector, civil society, international organizations, the technical and academic communities and other relevant stakeholders.

“USCIB believes that the multistakeholder model for Internet governance continues to be the best method to enable the whole-of-society/whole-of-government consideration of digital economy issues,” said Barbara Wanner, who leads USCIB work on ICT policy. “Given the rapid pace of technological change, governments need the perspectives provided by business, technical community, and civil society to better understand what policies are commercially viable, technically feasible, and offer adequate personal privacy protections. The inputs of all stakeholders produce a flexible policy environment critical to empowering the rapidly evolving digital economy.”

USCIB’s comments also noted that stakeholder inclusion can lower the risk of unintended consequences and increase legitimacy and adoption of policies. Top-down government-imposed policies and regulations often cannot keep pace with technological breakthroughs and can serve as a drag on development and innovation, and potentially infringe upon human rights.

 

Staff Contact:   Barbara Wanner

VP, ICT Policy
Tel: 202.617.3155

Barbara Wanner directs USCIB’s work on information, communications and technology issues. She works with members and government officials on a wide range of international business issue that include advocating for the continuation of the multi-stakeholder model of Internet governance and for policies aimed at promoting the stability, openness and innovative flexibility of the Internet. She represents USCIB members’ interests in several international forums, including the UN, APEC and the OECD.
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